Layered V-Neck Tutorial from mahlicadesigns

I ran across a picture of a v-neck tee a while back that had a double layered neck band and added it to my collection of interesting clothing details to try someday. Unlike most things in my little collection, I did spend some time working this one out using the Tabor V-neck pattern and I’ve put together a tutorial to share with you.

For my layered V-neck I used oatmeal Baby French Terry from Simply By Ti. The baby french terry is light enough to drape nicely in the Tabor and there’s barely any bulk in the double layered neckband. When choosing fabric for your project, experiment by folding layers together to see if you like how they look.

I’m really happy with the overall look I achieved with the layered neckband and this color has been a very useful addition to my wardrobe. If I were to do it again though, I might not use the Tabor pattern combined with this technique. The V on the Tabor is pretty deep and using a narrower band than the pattern calls for at the center front makes me feel a little exposed.

Maybe, but probably not, I’ll put on the wider band that the Tabor calls for (because I love this top) and make another layered V-neck using another pattern.

Layered V-Neck Tutorial

The measurements provided are based on the Tabor V-neck size 8. As a guideline, the outerband should come down and cover approximately 2/3 the length of the front of your v-neck, shoulder to center front. My innerband starts at the shoulder and goes to center front. You can also cut the inner band to fit the entire neckband if you are not concerned about bulk.
You can adapt the technique to your favorite V-neck tee pattern, but you’ll need to adjust the band lengths I’ve given to fit.

Cut your custom bands:

Innerband cut 2:   2.25in X 14in    (3/4in finished width)

Outerband cut 1:   3in X 25in    (1 1/8in finished width)

Interface the center V on the bodice of your tee and sew the front and back together at the shoulders.

Apply fusible web along the short ends of the outerband piece. Fold back the short ends wrong sides together by 1/2in and press to secure with the fusible web.

Mark the center (center back) and mark the shoulder seams 5in away from center back on the outerband.

Sew the innerband pieces together forming a V at center front. Using a 3/8in seam allowance, insert and baste the innerband into place along the V. Don’t baste the entire length of the inner bands, just a few inches around the center V.

Starting at center back, leaving the outerband unfolded, pin the single layer of the outerband in place along the neckline. Stretch the outerband slightly as you pin in place from center back to the shoulder seam. The bands don’t need to be eased in from shoulder to center front.

Next, pin the innerband in place along the bottom portion of the neckline up to the shoulder seam. The innerband should overlap the single layer of the outerband.  Trim away any excess length of the inner band that extends past the shoulder seam.

Lastly, fold over the outerband, sandwiching the innerband within and repin all layers as needed along the entire neckline. Remember the outerband is eased slightly between the shoulders and center back.

If you want to check your proportions first, baste the entire neck band into place (innerband and outerband now functioning as one unit) using a 3/8in seam allowance.

Sew/serge your layered neckband into place using 3/8in seam allowance. Complete the construction of your tee per the pattern instructions.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

You might also like: Tabor V-Neck and Lander shorts

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Chi Town Skirt in Corduroy for The Fabric Guys

In an effort to spark some motivation to sew, I put together a small sewing plan to round out my fall wardrobe. I included a Chi Town Skirt, a couple pairs of pants and some easy to make tops.

I’m working through the bottoms slowly and have pretty much given up on the idea of making the tops. I guess making a plan didn’t really work to get the fires lit under my sewjo after all.

 

I did add a wonderful rust corduroy skirt to my wardrobe though. Here’s a sneak peek of the Corduroy Chi Town skirt that I made for the Sewcial Network blog featuring corduroy from The Fabric Guys. You can read the full details here.

 

 

On the topic of corduroy, I needed a refresher on sewing with it, so I compiled all the tips I gathered up into one helpful post to share. Click through to see.

11 Tips for Sewing with Corduroy

Until next time,

Melissa E of mahlicadesigns

Tessa Sweater Dress- featuring DG Patterns Ribbed Knit

The Tessa Sweater Dress I made to share this week helps me get close to having all the winter wardrobe pieces I need this year. I really like wearing dresses, but it can be hard to feel warm enough in the cold months, so I’m hoping a nice sweater dress will do the trick.

When Daniela listed this ribbed sweater knit in her shop, I knew I wanted to try sewing with it and hoped it would work for a sweater dress. I’d not sewn a dress with sweater knit before, so I was a little concerned that the length of the piece would cause the fabric to stretch and lengthen when worn. In this case I believe the structure that the ribbing offers and the smaller weave keep things in nice shape.

My plan was to sew up the Tessa Dress last minute to wear for Thanksgiving. I’d look nice, be comfortable all day, and have room for an expanding belly. I came down sick just before the big day and only just got the meal prep I was responsible for complete with the help of my husband- thanks my dear.

Sewing was not happening when I just wanted to crawl into bed, so the Tessa and I missed Thanksgiving. No worries though, I got to wear her to my office Christmas party last week and had a wonderful time.

The Pattern: I used the Tessa Sweater & Dress Pattern from DG Patterns in a size 10 based on my measurements. Through the hips I graded down to an 8 for a closer fit. Depending on the stretch of the fabric, I could easily sew up a straight size 8 next time.

The Fabric: Striped ribbed sweater knit (similar) from the DG Patterns shop.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

You might also like the Lazo Trousers I made in the DG Patterns’ Organic Tencel.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

Sail Away Tank featuring Simply By Ti Fabrics

I’m coming at you today with my Sail Away tank hack made with Simply By Ti fabric** My intention was to show my Sail Away outfit together, but I goofed and didn’t get pictures of the tank and Landers together.

See all of my Sail Away outfit inspiration here.

The Pattern The free Durango Tank modified as described below. Size 10. Also shown are the Lander shorts from True Bias.

The Fabrics Navy with ivory stripes rayon for the tank and khaki stretch twill for the shorts. Both from Simply By Ti** Rayon jersey is great for its drape and that’s what I really wanted for the tank to lay well over my hips. The stretch twill is the perfect fabric for shorts. The stretch is great for making a trim fitting pair of Landers, doesn’t bag out, and the weight is just right for bottoms.

The Hack

Durango Tank in size 10. I shortened the tank by 1in at the waist line and did a 1/2in sway back adjustment to fit my particular shape. I also dropped the neckline by 1 in at CF and CB. Next, I traced the full front bodice to draw my contrast piece.

To make my S-curve contrast piece, I measured 9 3/4in up from the CF hem line to mark my natural waistline at the CF and at the left (as worn) side seam. On the right (as worn) side seam I marked 4 1/2in up from the CF hem line. I used my french curve to draw a convex curving line from the left side flattening out at the CF, then curving in a concave curve from CF to the right side.

Grab another piece of tracing paper and trace the bottom of your bodice piece marking the S curved line very clearly. Mark a notch at the CF of the curved line. Make sure you have space above the curve on your new tracing to add a seam allowance. Add your seam allowance to the top of your piece and transfer the CF notch to the new cut line. I use a compass to add seam allowances to curved lines. Be sure to draw your grain line marking and the perpendicular bias line marking if you are going to switch up your stripes like I did. Trim away excess paper from your new pattern piece

Go back to your main bodice piece and add the same seam allowance below the original curve line you drew and mark the CF notch. Trim away the excess paper below the new curve line you’ve drawn.

Now cut out your fabric. Attach the lower portion of the bodice to the top bodice piece before continuing with the pattern instructions as normal.

Make yours even better by making your curve more S-shaped than mine.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

**As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

You might also like Sail Away Lander shorts.

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Sail Away Lander Short Tutorial & How To Attach Slotted Buttons

Lander wm 4

I got a lot of positive feedback on my Sail Away Lander shorts that I made in the Who Made It Best challenge. They turned out pretty close to my vision, so I’m happy.

If you’d like to make a pair for yourself or borrow any of my ideas, I’ve put together a tutorial of my modifications to make it easier for you. Check out my Sail Away inspiration board for even more ideas.

I made modifications that fall into three categories: 1. Angle the pocket opening 2. Lengthen for a higher waist and 3. Relocate the fly closure.

I’ll also share how I attached my slotted buttons.

Size: I originally made a pair of Lander pants and shorts in size 10 per the measurement chart. I like the length I get in that size, but really needed to size down to an 8 for a better fit in the width. For my Sail Away Landers I wanted a pretty slim/snug fit in the stretch twill, so I sized down even further to a 6, still keeping the length of my pieces at a size 10.

  1. Angled Pocket

Trace off the pocket pattern piece in your size and be sure to add the grainline marking. Measure and mark a line 3 1/2in away from and parallel to the long edge of the pocket. Mark the point (a) where the slightly curved top edge of the pocket meets the newly drawn parallel line. Measure down 1 3/8in from your (a) mark and mark again (b). Mark point (c) where the original pocket curve meets the side of the pocket. Connect (b) and (c) with a straight line. You now have an angled pocket opening. ** You may have to tweak these measurements slightly for a different size, but they will get you really close. (Original design lines are in grey pencil, newly drafted lines are in blue pencil)

Pocket alteration 1.2

Next up you’ll need to draw a new pocket interfacing piece. Simply trace your new angled pocket edge and draw a matching line 1in away to create the new piece.

Interfacing collage

 

2. Lengthen for a higher waist

I measured down 1 1/2in from top of the side seams (front & back pieces) to mark my lengthen line. Your lengthen line should be perpendicular to the grain line. Cut and spread 1in (or more). I’m short-waisted so 1in was plenty for me.

I chose not to lengthen my pocket piece. If you choose to, I suggest lengthening below the angled pocket opening, so you don’t skew those proportions.

3. Move the fly

We’re mostly just switching up the construction a little. Pin or mark just above the pocket on the side seam. Stitch the side seam closed from bottom(hem) up to your marking and back stitch to reinforce.  The dot marking on the fly pieces will match up to the top of your side seam stitching.

Pin mark

In the pattern instructions the left fly attaches to the left (as worn) center front and the right fly piece attaches to the right (as worn) center front. Instead, you will attach the Left fly to the Front pant/short piece and the Right fly to the Back pant/short piece.

Fly pieces

Fly pieces inside view

Follow the pattern instructions for completing the fly and button closure. The fly pieces as cut will extend up past the waistline, simply trim any excess. Once you have the fly completed, you’ll want to add a securing bar tack through the two fly pieces. Make sure they are laying flat over each other like they do when the fly is closed. Pin together and sew the bar tack through the two layers.

Bar tack detail 1

Note: Moving the fly to the side will make the pattern notches on your waistband irrelevant, but you’ll be fine. Simply attach following the directions and ease any areas that need it.

Things to consider.

  1. I’ve made two Landers before, so I knew I would be ok with a shorter side fly.
  2. I made mine with stretch twill, so going down a size and the shorter fly still works for me.
  3. Raising the waist may require further alterations of your CB seam, darts, and possibly the waistband.

Attaching Slotted Buttons (aka Canadian buttons or bar buttons)

I turned to the Self Sewn Wardrobe facebook group for direction with these.  I got the suggestions that these are attached with a ribbon, twill tape, or self fabric running through them and an example pic from a rtw jacket with this type of closure. I haven’t found a tutorial to verify that I did this properly, but this will get you started. If you have any suggestions, I’d love to hear them.

Your ribbon will run right down the middle of your buttons, so mark your button placement to the outside of each button so you can still see the markings after laying down the ribbon. Don’t skip the marking because we’ll be shifting those buttons up and down on the ribbon as we sew.

placket collage

Cut your ribbon about 1.5 times the length of the fly and slide all the buttons onto the bottom of the ribbon. Starting at the top of the fly. Slide one button up to the top of the ribbon leaving about 5/8in of ribbon extending above the top of the button. Position your button to line up with your placement mark, fold under the top edge of the ribbon by 1/4in and pin the ribbon in place. Also pin or mark your ribbon just above the top of your button. Slide the button down and out of the way to make two bar tacks. One along the top folded edge of the ribbon and the second on the marking for the top of the button. Straight stitch along the edges of the ribbon between the bar tacks.

Slide the button back up into position and get ready to experiment with how much slack you’ll need in the ribbon. I tried using a match stick, chop stick, and a couple other things before settling on the shaft of my seam ripper. Place your spacer beneath your button keeping the button centered with your button placement marking. Pin down the ribbon to line up with the bottom edge of the button. Your next bar tack will go where you pin. Remove your spacer and test how well the button fits through the button holes. Adjust as needed. When you have the slack determined and the ribbon pinned, slide the button up as far as you can and make a bar tack where you pinned. Your first button is now secured.

Button detail

Repeat this process for the rest of your buttons. Positioning your button with the ribbon flat, marking and sewing the top bar tack along the top edge of the button, repositioning the button with your spacer to get your slack, and marking and sewing the bottom bar tack. If you have a presser foot that will fit, straight stitch along the ribbon edges between your buttons. (I couldn’t make that work.)

Slotted Button Detail 1

After all your buttons are secured, leave enough ribbon to extend to the bottom of the fly and straight stitch along the ribbon edges to secure. I was also able to catch the bottom of my ribbon in a bar tack that I used to secure my fly pieces together. Trim any excess.

Next time I’d do the top button with a separate piece of ribbon. I think I’d like the looks of that better. I’d also apply my buttons before attaching the waistband, then I could secured top edge of the ribbon in a seam and have a nicer finish.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

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A Margo Mod for Pattern Hack week on The Monthly Stitch

Since seeing this cute top on pinterest, I’ve had it on my sewing list to make one for myself. The Margo Blouse quickly came to mind as a pattern I could use as a jumping off point.

Margo Hack by mahlicadesigns

I’m calling this one a success!  With just a few minor missteps working with these fabrics, I found the fruition of my idea came along pretty easily.

Margo Hack by mahlicadesigns

The Pattern: The Margo Blouse from Blue Dot Patterns. I used the straight hem version with the 3/4 length sleeve in a size small. After making my modifications to the yokes, I followed the pattern directions for an easy finish.

The Fabric: 1/2y of rayon/spandex jersey and 1/2y black mesh. I also used 3/8in elastic in the sleeve hems as directed and 5/8in FOE at the neckline.

Margo Hack by mahlicadesigns

The Mods:

1. I added my own button plackets, made from the jersey knit, to the back by cutting the back yoke in half at center back and adding a 1in x 4.25in finished placket piece to each edge. I overlapped the plackets, basted along the bottom and then attached the yoke to the bodice as normal.

2. I raised the neckline at center front by 2.5in and smoothed out the curve.

3.  I used FOE to finish my neckline (the pattern has yoke facings as a finish) and French seams at the shoulder and sleeve seams.

Margo Hack by mahlicadesigns

Next time I would raise the seamline across the front about 3/4in, it just looks a little low to me with the shear fabric. I would also only raise the neckline at center front by 2in instead of 2.5in, it feels a little high.

Making a modified Margo should take you about 4.75 hours or less.

Total Cost: $11.50     Fabrics: $10    Notions $1.50      Pattern $0*

I’m submitting my Margo hack into The Monthly Stitch’s contest for Indie Pattern Month. Take a look at what other sewists are doing and return to The Monthly Stitch on June 24th to vote for your favorite pattern hacks.

 

*I received a free copy of the Margo Blouse Pattern for hosting the Creative Sewing Challenge.