Ocean Wave Clutch Tutorial from mahlicadesigns

I’ve been playing with pleats and tucks again and wrote up a tutorial for you over at On the Cutting Floor.

Take a visit for the full tutorial.

Rock it collage

Advertisements

A Margo Mod for Pattern Hack week on The Monthly Stitch

Since seeing this cute top on pinterest, I’ve had it on my sewing list to make one for myself. The Margo Blouse quickly came to mind as a pattern I could use as a jumping off point.

Margo Hack by mahlicadesigns

I’m calling this one a success!  With just a few minor missteps working with these fabrics, I found the fruition of my idea came along pretty easily.

Margo Hack by mahlicadesigns

The Pattern: The Margo Blouse from Blue Dot Patterns. I used the straight hem version with the 3/4 length sleeve in a size small. After making my modifications to the yokes, I followed the pattern directions for an easy finish.

The Fabric: 1/2y of rayon/spandex jersey and 1/2y black mesh. I also used 3/8in elastic in the sleeve hems as directed and 5/8in FOE at the neckline.

Margo Hack by mahlicadesigns

The Mods:

1. I added my own button plackets, made from the jersey knit, to the back by cutting the back yoke in half at center back and adding a 1in x 4.25in finished placket piece to each edge. I overlapped the plackets, basted along the bottom and then attached the yoke to the bodice as normal.

2. I raised the neckline at center front by 2.5in and smoothed out the curve.

3.  I used FOE to finish my neckline (the pattern has yoke facings as a finish) and French seams at the shoulder and sleeve seams.

Margo Hack by mahlicadesigns

Next time I would raise the seamline across the front about 3/4in, it just looks a little low to me with the shear fabric. I would also only raise the neckline at center front by 2in instead of 2.5in, it feels a little high.

Making a modified Margo should take you about 4.75 hours or less.

Total Cost: $11.50     Fabrics: $10    Notions $1.50      Pattern $0*

I’m submitting my Margo hack into The Monthly Stitch’s contest for Indie Pattern Month. Take a look at what other sewists are doing and return to The Monthly Stitch on June 24th to vote for your favorite pattern hacks.

 

*I received a free copy of the Margo Blouse Pattern for hosting the Creative Sewing Challenge.

Georgia On My Mind. I hacked the Georgia Top again

I made my first Georgia Top for the Creative Sewing Challenge back in November and when putting together a post to inspire creativity with the Georgia pattern, I just had to put another version on my “to sew” list.

Georgia Hack by mahlicadesigns

I used the Georgia Top from Blue Dot Patterns in a size small again and modified the pattern by adding length to the sleeves and making a new cutting line for the lace piecing (tutorial below).

Georgia Hack by mahlicadesigns

I used a stable jersey knit from my stash paired with a lace purchased from Fabric Mart. I’ve not sewn with lace before, but since the lace I chose is not as fine and sheer as some lace can be, I just treated it like a knit and constructed the whole project with my serger. No problems.

Georgia Hack by mahlicadesigns

I’m just as pleased with my second Georgia, but have to laugh at myself for making two versions that have built in ventilation.

Georgia Hack by mahlicadesigns

Get my look (tutorial):

Let’s draw a new pattern line on the front pattern piece. I marked my outside shoulder at 4.25in from the neckline. I made a bust mark 4in down from CF neckline and 5in over (next time I’d make it 6in over to cover more of my chest). I marked the side 4in up from the bottom. I used a French curve to draw my new cutting line; keeping the line through most of the body vertical with a slight curve up to the shoulder and a dramatic curve at the waistline.

**I had the benefit of having a Georgia already made that I could use to determine the placement of my markings.

New Drawing lines

Cut along your new pattern line. Take a moment to label your new piece. Use your new front piece to trace your line onto the unmodified back piece. Cut your new pattern line on the back and label.

New drawing line traced

New Pieces Cut

I added 7.5in to the sleeve to make it long sleeve on me ( I’dd add more next time). I recommend you do some measuring to figure what will work for you.

Tips:

  • Label your new pattern pieces.
  • Add seam allowance to your new cut lines: I marked the cutting line on my fabric with chalk; you can trace off new pattern pieces if you want.
  • Make sure you’re ok with the amount of exposure the lace will give. I plan on wearing a cami.

A modified Georgia top should take you 2 hours to complete. Add about 20 minutes to draw new pattern lines.

Fabric $3  Pattern $0*  Total Cost $3

I received the Georgia Top Pattern free as a gift for hosting the Creative Sewing Challenge

Twisted Tuck Wristlet tutorial by mahlicadesigns

Feature collage

For the September Sew With Me challenge on facebook, I needed to make an accessory. After being stumped a while, I came up with an idea for an accessory that I actually needed; a small purse with a handle. I drafted my own pattern, so I wanted to do a practice run before working with a faux leather for my final version. The first version out of quilting cottons was made up for my So Sew Easy Sewing Swap partner. I hope she likes it.

Since I put in some effort to draft my pattern and work out the twisted tucks detail, I wanted to share a tutorial so you can make one too.

You’ll need:

Twisted Tuck Wristlet template, 4.5in X 14in rectangle for twisted tuck detail, 3in X 11in piece for strap, 11in X 8in for interior pocket (optional), fusible fleece or heavy weight fusible stabilizer, 9in zipper.

Cut Exterior Fabric: 1 main body, 2 front side pieces, 1 tuck piece, 1 strap piece

Cut Interior Fabric: 2 main body, 1 pocket.

Cut fusible fleece: 2 main body (hint: trim away about 1/2in from edges to reduce bulk in your seams, especially at the top edge)

First we’ll make the twisted tucks insert.

  1. Grab your 4.5 x 14 inch piece. Mark one of the shorter ends on the wrong side as the Top. Make your first fold, wrong sides together, 2in down from the Top edge. Press. Sew 3/4in away from and parallel to your folded edge.**
  2. Make your next fold, wrong sides together,  1 5/8in down from the stitching line you made in step #1. Press and sew 3/4in from your folded edge. Repeat until you have a total of five tucks.
  3. Press tucks down. Baste tucks down on one edge using 3/8in seam allowance. Fold and pin tucks up on other side. The edges will not line up squarely, that’s ok, its more important to keep the piece squared up. Baste in place using a 3/8in seam allowance. You should have 1/2in of fabric above your top tuck and more below your bottom tuck.Tucks collage
  4. Using a 1/2in seam allowance, attach the side pieces to the tucks insert, lining the pieces up at the top. Press. The insert should be a little longer than the side pieces, trim away any excess after the side pieces are attached.

front

Next, we finish getting our pieces ready.

5. Trim 1/2in away from the top, flat edge of the fleece if you haven’t done that already. Apply the fusible fleece to the wrong sides of the two exterior pieces.

6. Press the pocket piece in half lengthwise, wrong sides together. Center the pocket on top of one of the lining pieces, right sides up. The lower raw edge of the pocket should line up with the lower edge of the lining piece. Bits of the pocket will hang over. To make a 3in card slot, I mark the center of the pocket, then measure and mark 1.5in out each side of center. Stitch along the marked lines, backstitching at the top to reinforce. You can divide the remaining pocket area as desired or leave them alone.  Tip:  1.75in to 2in width is good for a lipstick slot. Trim off any overhanging parts of the pocket.Pocket7. Press the strap in half lengthwise wrong sides facing. Open up, fold long edges in to meet at the center, press, and fold again. Same as if you’re making a double fold binding. Stitch 1/8in from the folded edges to close the strap. Place one of the exterior pieces right side up. Position the strap 1in down from top edge and with raw edges facing out. Baste in place.

backAssembly:

8. Mark a line 1/8in down from top edge on right side of a Lining piece.** Position the zipper right side up along this line, making sure the top zipper stop is about 3/8in in from the side. Pin in place. Position one of the Exterior pieces on top, right side down. The zipper is sandwiched between the layers. Using a zipper foot, stitch 1/2in from edge. Repeat with the second lining and exterior pieces.

Wristlet zipper insertion collage

9. Open out the layers so zipper is in the center. Press and topstich about 1/8in away from exposed zipper tape.

Top stitching collage

10. With needle & thread, make a new zipper stop about 3/8in from edge. Trim away excess length of the zipper. Open zipper by about 3/4s.zipper end collage

11. Fold one exterior piece over onto the other exterior piece, right sides together. Line up exterior and lining pieces, making sure open edges of zipper are lined up. Pin as needed.

12. Leave a 3in opening at the bottom edge of the lining pieces. About 1.5in from center bottom of lining, start stitching with a 5/8in seam allowance, as you sew around the curve gradually change your seam allowance to 1/2in. before you reach the zipper. Sew slowly as you go over the zipper. As you come back around to the lining, increase your seam allowance to 5/8in after the curve.stitching

13. Carefully trim excess bulk from the zipper corners. Clip the curves and trim seam allowance around the bottom edge of the lining by about half.

14. Pull the wristlet right side out through the opening in the lining. Hand stitch the lining closed. Use a turning tool to push out the corners at the top and smooth out the lining and curves.

lining opening

Zip it up and your done!

Final collage 3

** This sentence edited after publishing to be more clear.

Fabric Bins tutorial

This week I needed a quick and easy project, so I tried out a crafty idea that I saw in Nai Nai’s kitchen. I’d like to share with you how I quickly made a few fabric bins to help wrangle the loosey goosey stuff that lives in the drawers at my house. I’m sure there are plenty of templates and tutorials out there, but I just wanted to dive in and do it my way. Mine are 7x2x2.

100_3784

You’ll Need:

 Some basic sewing gear, heavy weight fusible stabilizer, two 12×7 inch pieces of coordinating fabric.

100_3775

Tip: Making multiples is efficient and easy. Stack multiple layers of fabric when cutting and chain stitch your corners.

Step 1: Cut a 12in X 7in rectangle in each fabric (2total) and one 12in X 7in interfacing.

Step 2: Apply the fusible to the wrong side of the outside fabric.

Step 3: Mark a 2.25in square at each corner. Stack your layers and cut out the corners.

100_3776

Step 4: Sew each corner, right sides together, using a 1/4in seam allowance. Sew from the raw edges down all the way past the cut edge. See below. Do this for all eight corners.

100_3781100_3780

Step 5: Nest the two pieces right sides together, pin if needed. Sew the top edge using 1/4in seam allowance and leaving a 2in opening along one of the longer edges. Turn right side out.

Step 6: Fold under raw edges of the 2in opening and pin as needed. Topstitch along the entire top edge closing the opening.

100_3784
All Done

Optional Step 7: For some added shaping, pinch together each upper corner and topstich for about 1/2in from the upper edge. See below.

Topstitch the top 1/2 inch
Topstitch the top 1/2 inch
100_3783
Topstitched corners for more structure

Abigail Bib by mahlicadesigns

I recently made a Caterpillar Onesie as a gift for a girlfriend’s new baby, shortly thereafter I received an invite for a welcome baby party. I sure didn’t want to show up empty handed , so I needed something quick and easy since my new little guy (three months old now) doesn’t give me much time for sewing and crafting any more. Hurray again for Pinterest. I love the bibs made over at Stubbornly Crafty and used her template to make my own simplified version.

Here’s how I made mine.

Supplies: Approximately one 12 x 15 piece each of terry cloth and quilter’s cotton, coordinating ribbon, and sew on velcro.

Cut out one bib in each of the fabrics using the template. Aline your ribbon across the quilters cotton and sew in place along the top and bottom edge of the ribbon. Using one of your machines fancy stitches might look nice here.

Place your bib pieces right sides together. Starting about three inches from one of the bottom corners, stitch toward the corner and around the bib. After rounding back around the other bottom corner, stop stitching to leave an opening about four inches so you may turn the bib right side out. Clip the seam allowance in the curved areas. Turn your bib and use a tool to push out the corners and curves.

Pin the bottom opening closed. Top stitch around the entire bib, being sure to catch the front and back of the bottom opening to secure it shut.

Sew on your velcro to each side of the neck flaps. Be sure one piece is sewn on the front, and one piece to the back so it will close properly.

Follow me on Pinterest

The Helene Bib Onesie by mahlicadesigns

I’m borrowing my bib idea from my Sweet Treats Top to make another baby gift for one of my friends. This will use the third of a five pack of Onesies I  purchased recently; I’m challenging myself to use them all in a creative way. Let’s see how I do.

Here’s how I made the Helene Bib Onesie.

Supplies: Onesie or other top, two 3/8 in buttons, 1 1/4 in x 2 in fabric for the placket, 4 in x 7 in fabric for the ruffle, and 3/4 in x 1 1/2 in fusible interfacing (optional).

Fold the 4 x 7 in ruffle piece of fabric in half length wise, right sides facing. Sew along the short ends using a 1/4 in seam allowance. Turn and press. Using a long basting stitch, stitch along the top raw edge of the ruffle piece. Use the basting stitches to gather the upper edge into a ruffle.

Pin the ruffle in place at the center front of your neckline.

Center and fuse the interfacing to the wrong side of the placket piece, then fold in all raw edges by 1/4 in and press towards the center of the wrong side. Pin the placket in place over the ruffle, being sure to cover the raw edges of the ruffle.

Top stitch around the edge of the placket through all layers.

Hand sew on your buttons.