Ally Skirt and Onyx Shirt for the Knock It Off tour

Today I’m sharing an outfit I made for the Knock It Off blog tour hosted by Lulu & Celeste and Sprouting Jube Jube. The mission: Knock Off a look from a designer or rtw.

Knock it off banner 3

Ally 4

The challenging part of the tour parameters was finding my inspiration. I hadn’t followed designers or Ready To Wear (rtw) companies at all, but this was the perfect push to broaden my view.

Ally 8

Since I didn’t even know where to start, I had to work backwards. I knew I wanted to make a red skirt for summer, so I started looking at companies I’d heard people talking about- Anthropologie, Mod Cloth, and Urban Outfitters. I searched for red skirts and pinned the outfits I liked. Success! I found this outfit on Anthropologie that I wanted.

Photo from Anthropologie

 

Ally 6

Putting together the Knock Off was super easy from my pattern stash. The Ally Skirt and Onyx Shirt had the right silhouettes and I quickly hashed a plan to hack the Ally to get the look.

Ally 2

I made the Onyx in a size 4 using a cotton woven (an IKEA sheet from their clearance bin). Simple enough since I’ve made the Onyx before (here).

For the Ally I made a size small again (first Ally here) using a cotton sateen from Joann Fabrics, drafted an angled pocket, added 1.5in in height to the waistband, and added a zip fly and clasp closure.

Ally closeup

I’m very pleased with how my outfit came out. It harkens to the inspiration photo and it’s my style and color scheme. I’m gettting better and better at hacking the patterns I own to get a look I want. It’s a learning process and of course there are goof ups like this one:

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I forgot to extend the waistband to account for the zipper fly extension. Whoopsie. I made it work by tappering it a bit.

I was a little short on fabric after drafting my hacks, so I was able to stashbust a little more of my quilting cotton stash for the waistband facing and fly shield.

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I’m really happy with my outfit and that I can make myself a look instead of shelling out the $150 it would have taken for the Anthropologie version. Yikes!

My cost: Total: $13   Fabrics $9    Notions $4  Patterns: $0 Stash

If you’d like me to write up a tutorial on my Ally Skirt hack, let me know in the comments.

 

Now I’d like you to pay a visit the my fellow bloggers to see how they Knock It Off 

Monday, April 24  Lulu & CelesteCall AjairePaisley RootsAdventures with Bubba and Bug

Tuesday, April 25  Sprouting JubeJube mahlicadesignsSew and Tell Project

Wednesday, April 26  Lulu & CelesteSewSophieLynnNini and AshLittle Heart Threads

Thursday, April 27  Sprouting JubeJubesewingbytiInspinrationHouse of Estrela

Friday, April 28  Lulu & CelesteDuchess & HareCreative CounselorFAM

As always, thanks for reading today.

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Ally Skirt from Blue Dot Patterns

Frankly, I was very happy to let the current “denim everything” trend pass on by me. If I followed the trend back in middle school, I just don’t want anything to do with it.

And yet once again, my mind was changed by a pattern. The Ally Skirt is a six gore skirt with contoured waistband, length options, flap, pocket option, and top stitching.

Ally skirt on mahlcadesigns

Two ideas struck immediately when looking at the Ally; denim with copper snaps and yellow top stitching or corduroy in a camel/caramel color for that 70s feel. So very on trend right now. The new Ally Skirt just called out to be made up in denim.

I tested the Ally Skirt pattern for Blue Dot Patterns. Blue Dot Patterns may sound familiar. I’ve made up two Georgia‘s (here and here), hosted the Creative Sewing Challenge last fall, and one of my ideas for the Margo Blouse is on my sewing table now.

Ally Skirt by mahlicadesigns

I used a lightweight 7 oz. denim from my stash to make up my Ally in a size medium. With some pattern piece Tetris and using an extremely tight lay out, I was able to get my skirt cut out of 5/8 yard x 60in wide. If you have a directional print, fabric with nap, or narrower fabric; you’ll need more.

Ally Skirt by mahlicadesigns

Why I recommend the pattern: 1. Oh my is it so easy. All the pieces could get confusing, but the way they’re labeled and notched makes it no problem. 2. Diane, the pattern designer, even includes fitting as part of the pattern directions. Instead of a 1/2in seam allowance at the sides, I used a 5/8in seam allowance: Fitting Done! 3. A contoured waist band. I’m a pear shape so that’s perfect for me. 4. The style is classic and very on trend right now too.

Get yours! Get your Ally pattern for 30% off, for a limited time, directly from Blue Dot Patterns or from UpCraft Club.

Ally Skirt by mahlicadesigns

I chose snaps that were bigger than the recommended button size, so I skipped the top stitching at the outer edge of the button placket.

Ally Skirt by mahlicadesigns

Hey, I’m pretty proud of my top stitching here.

Ally Skirt by mahlicadesigns

That pocket flap is purely decor. I don’t need pockets in everything, so I’m cool with it. If you are in the pockets on everything camp there’s a pocket option for you.

I styled the Ally skirt with a cowl neck tee; with my banded Kirsten Kimono tee and RTW jacket; and a RTW sweater.

Ally Styling collage

The Ally should take you about 3.75 hours to complete. In a size medium with creative layout I used 5/8 yard of fabric.

Total cost: $6.50           Fabric: $3      Notions: $3.50       Pattern: $0*

 

*I received the Ally Pattern for free as a tester. Do I have to explain that these are my own thoughts about the pattern? They are.

I took a leap this week.

I’ve been making a few navy tops lately and didn’t really feel like they paired up well with the bottoms is my wardrobe. After a little brainstroming, I got an idea.

Goldenrod Yellow – Meet my toned down color palette and work some magic!

Union St Tee w/ S2451 skirt

I’ve had it in my mind that I cannot wear yellow because of some bad color choices in the past that made me look sickly. I’ve also been wanting a yellow jacket for the longest time and kept hoping to find the right yellow tone that would work for me.

S2541 Golderod Skirt w/ Union St Tee

Enter a TNT skirt pattern and this goldenrod fabric from my destash pile and a small prayer that this idea would work.

S2541 Golderod Skirt w/ Georgia Top

I think I have a small victory here. I can wear yellow and my wardrobe is now better rounded.

S2451 in Goldenrod

The pattern: Simplicity 2451 view D with front pleats removed in size 14. Removing the pleats was the only alteration. I simply folded/pinched out the pleats from the pattern tissue before cutting.

The fabric: I pulled this cotton(?) woven out of my giveaway/sell stack. I inherited it some time ago and it was so close to being donated.

Notes: My first time making a lapped zipper; oh my, so much easier than an invisible zipper. Despite reviewing my notes from the last time I made this skirt, I forgot to add some length. I had a narrower hem to work with than I’d like, but really no big deal.

Styling: I’ve paired my Goldenrod skirt with a charcoal Union St. Tee (unblogged), my lace Georgia hack, and a rtw blouse (meh).

Goldenrod Skirt collage

Simplicty 2451 view D should take you about 3 hours to make. A size 14 used 1yd of fabric, hem tape, and a purchased zipper.

Total cost: $2.00    Fabric $0-stash     Notions(zipper) $2        Pattern $0-stash

Have you been making any bold sewing moves lately?

Quilted Jade Skirt for SV Design Crew

Jade Skirt v.2

I made up a modified version of the Jade Skirt from Paprika Patterns using a wonderful quilted double knit from Sew Vagabond. I recently joined the SV Design Crew**.

Jade Skirt styling

The Pattern: I’ve made the Jade skirt before here, so I knew it would be perfect for making a mini skirt to show off the quilted texture of this fabric. To skip the folded front, I used the front lining pattern piece as my shell instead. I also lengthened the front and back pattern pieces to 16in. The Jade’s waistband is one curved piece, so to conserve fabric and keep the textured pattern of the fabric a little more lined up, I pieced the waistband instead.

I made up a size 5 again, lengthening it as I said above and then, because the fabric has a good stretch, I end up using a 3/4in seam allowance on the sides instead of 1/2in given in the pattern.

I’ve done an exposed zipper before with only a so-so result, so I wanted to try one again to give the skirt that extra something and to get a better hold on the technique. I struggled getting the zipper in without having little tucks and wrinkles at the bottom corners. I finally got it after a few tries and changing the order of construction. Now I know what I need to do to nail it next time.

Jade Skirt styling

The Fabric: A natural fiber quilted double knit in navy from Sew Vagabond Shop (available late summer) for the shell and a navy jersey knit from my stash for the lining. I’ve actually used a similar fabric before, but wow what a difference between the two. My Jasper dress made in a quilted jaquard made it into my February Fail post because the fabric was just an absolute disaster, it has that slick polyester feel and is snagging and pilling like crazy. This navy quilted knit is holding up so well after washing and even after having to rework that exposed zipper many times and a little seam ripping too.

Fabric comparison

I’ve styled my new Jade with a rtw blouse and my Burda 7140 faux leather jacket, with my Melly Sews Peasant Blouse, and a rtw plain white tee.

Jade styling collage

Making a modified Jade skirt should take you about 3.25 hours, assuming you get an exposed zipper in on the first try. In a size 5 with a pieced waistband I used 1/2yard of the quilted knit and 1/2yard of the jersey knit lining.

Total Cost: $3   Pattern: stash   Fabric shell: Free**  Lining: $1   Notions: $2

** When I make a qualifying purchase as part of the SV Design Crew, I receive 2 free yards of fabric to make what ever I want and Sew Vagabond Shop gets to use my pictures to show off their fabrics.

Burda 6928, the most boring skirt ever.

The last piece I’m sharing from the Sew With Me challenge is Burda Young #6928, a pieced straight skirt.

Burda Skirt
Burda Skirt

I ordered this fabric for its ivory/vanilla/putty color to fit in with my Core Wardrobe color palette. What I got looks exactly like unbleached muslin, it even has some of those flecks of color like muslin. I was under a deadline and sending it back didn’t make $ense, so I used it anyway. The resulting skirt is perfectly fine as a basic and fills a hole in my Core Wardrobe, but it’s resemblance to muslin and shape make it a pretty boring piece.

Burda Skirt by mahlicadesigns

Pattern Notes:

Burda #6928 View A, Size 12. Bottom weight cotton/lycra twill in Vanilla from Fabric mart (sold out)

Apparently the “Young” part of the pattern means no shaping through the hips. If you are straight up and down this pattern is for you, I am not. A pretty stretchy fabric and altering the waist band redeemed this pattern.

Burda 6928 Skirt by mahlicadesigns

I added 3in in length to make this mini a workable length for me (I’m 5’4″ and modest). The back waistband gapped a bit. Two 1/4in darts positioned right above the two back seams did the trick. I was not loving this skirt from almost the start, so I did not bother redrafting and recutting the back waist band. With the stretch of the fabric I was able to eliminate the zipper altogether. I also skipped the piping detail, which may have made this a little less boring but I was not inspired to do so at the time.

burda skirt detail

Burda 6928 should take you 2.75 hours to make, but honestly find a better pattern.

Pattern $1.99 Fabric $4.75  Total $6.75

Never Ending Summer with a Pin Peg Mini Skirt hack

When thinking about how to bring a summer feel to clothing that I can wear year round, I kept coming back to the idea of using fabrics with a summery print or colors for a fall/winter garment. The best I was coming up with was a floral lining in a jacket, but it just wasn’t what I was wanting to accomplish for Never Ending Summer.

Thanks to The Monthly Stitch’s August theme of “2 is the magic number” I got to thinking about making something reversible and viola the Reversible Pin Peg Mini idea was born. Summery on one side, wintry on the other.

PinPeg summer 1

PinPeg summer 2

PinPeg summer 3

Just a few details: I used an abstract stretch cotton sateen from Fabrics & Trimmings and a stretch cotton twill called Stingray from Felinus Fabrics (sold out). The Pin Peg Mini is a newer pattern release from Sew This Pattern. I paired fabrics with a similar stretch, weight and opacity.

PinPeg winter 1

PinPeg winter 3

I would resolutely insist that you make a muslin first. I’m glad I did because there was some weirdness with how the pattern printed. (I didn’t see anyone else report problems when researching, I’m sure I goofed it up) The size chart puts me at a size 10, but I sized up to a 12 on my first muslin and it was about 1in too narrow on the back and 3in too narrow at the front. Whhaa? I reprinted on some A4 paper I have, made sure there wasn’t something happening with the scaling, and got no difference in the pattern pieces. Unfortunately there are no finished garment measurements to help out either. I started my second muslin at size 16 and worked down from there. I ended up using size 12 for the back and size 14 pieces for the front and grading one size smaller at the waist. All this too say, measure your pattern pieces for fit and do a muslin.

PinPeg winter B1

Getting the right fit took a little work, but I’m really pleased with my reversible version. I was most excited about the black Stingray fabric, but I’m only meh about the finished look. I think a black zipper would not have distracted from the vertical print, so I’m considering painting over the metal on that side. I’m liking the watercolor side much more.

PinPeg winter 4

I haven’t thought through how I’m going to style it in the cooler months, but I feel good about my Never Ending Summer creation and I’m glad I can share how I made a reversible version.

A brief tutorial on how to make your Pin Peg Mini reversible:

Note: I’m just giving high level instructions so you can make your own. Good sewing practices like marking, trimming seams, and pressing are assumed. Also I’m assuming you know how to install a zipper.
  1. You will need the two front pattern pieces, back piece, two front waist band pieces and back waistband piece. (Set the facings and zipper flap pattern pieces aside)
  2. Determin your new zipper length. Abutt the left front and left front waist band pieces and measure along the zipper edge. Subtract 2.5in to account for seam allowances. Or wait until you’re to ready to insert the zipper and measure.100_4153
  3. Cut your fabrics separately. Cut main fabric right side up with pattern pieces right side up. Cut second fabric right side up and pattern pieces wrong side up.
  4. Sew all darts. Press the main fabric darts out, press the second fabric darts in.
  5. In main fabric, sew front 2 pieces to back piece at side seams. Repeat for second fabric.
  6. In main fabric, sew front waist band pieces to back waist band piece. Repeat for second fabric.
    **Note that the right waistband piece includes extra length for a button closure, I just trimmed the extra off after attaching the waistband to the skirt.
  7. In main fabric, sew the waist band to skirt body. Repeat for second fabric.
  8. Right sides together, line up the main skirt with the second skirt along the waist and hemlines. Sew the two skirts together along the waist band. Press. Sew the hem line together leaving a 10in opening along the back piece. You should now have a tube, open at two ends and a 10in opening at the hemline on the back piece.
  9. Sew in your zipper along the shorter front piece. Turn things right side out if it helps, then line up the other side of the zipper in the opening on the long front piece. Sew the zipper in the other side and the bottom of the longer seam closed at the same time.
  10. Now you’ll need to turn things right side out through the 10in opening in the bottom hem and hand stitch the opening closed.

Jade Skirt from Paprika Patterns for Summer Crush week

Meet my Summer Crush, the Jade Skirt from Paprika Patterns. (LinkUp your Summer Crush here)

Jade Skirt by mahlicadesigns

My interest was piqued last fall when the Jade came out, but it wasn’t until spring that I decided what fabric to use. Thanks to #sewlongsummer the Jade is finally taking up residence in my closet. I can really see this being a key part of my Core Wardrobe. The length is good for summer and paired with some colorful tights will be cute in fall and winter too.

Jade skirt by mahlicadesigns

I used a  Maggy London ponte from Fabric Mart for the shell and a cotton jersey from Girl Charlee for the lining. I’m very pleased with both fabrics for this project. The ponte is a good quality and the jersey has the right stability needed to support the folds on the Jade. The color is not as saturated on the jersey as I would like, so it may only be used in supporting rolls in other garments.

Jade skirt by mahlicadesigns

The pattern is not as difficult as those front folds make it look. There’s a tutorial video and a practice sheet to make sure you can do the folds correctly. I watched the video a couple of times and followed the tip to use colored pins and had no trouble with the folds. In fact, I got it on the first try.

Jade skirt by mahlicadesigns

Once you tack down those folds, the rest of the construction is elegant in its simplicity. The instructions include options to add an exposed zipper or an elastic waistband. I didn’t need to do either.

Jade Skirt by mahlicadesigns

The Jade Skirt should take you about 3.75 hours cut to finish.

Pattern: $7      Fabric: $9    Total: $16