Sail Away Lander Short Tutorial & How To Attach Slotted Buttons

Lander wm 4

I got a lot of positive feedback on my Sail Away Lander shorts that I made in the Who Made It Best challenge. They turned out pretty close to my vision, so I’m happy.

If you’d like to make a pair for yourself or borrow any of my ideas, I’ve put together a tutorial of my modifications to make it easier for you. Check out my Sail Away inspiration board for even more ideas.

I made modifications that fall into three categories: 1. Angle the pocket opening 2. Lengthen for a higher waist and 3. Relocate the fly closure.

I’ll also share how I attached my slotted buttons.

Size: I originally made a pair of Lander pants and shorts in size 10 per the measurement chart. I like the length I get in that size, but really needed to size down to an 8 for a better fit in the width. For my Sail Away Landers I wanted a pretty slim/snug fit in the stretch twill, so I sized down even further to a 6, still keeping the length of my pieces at a size 10.

  1. Angled Pocket

Trace off the pocket pattern piece in your size and be sure to add the grainline marking. Measure and mark a line 3 1/2in away from and parallel to the long edge of the pocket. Mark the point (a) where the slightly curved top edge of the pocket meets the newly drawn parallel line. Measure down 1 3/8in from your (a) mark and mark again (b). Mark point (c) where the original pocket curve meets the side of the pocket. Connect (b) and (c) with a straight line. You now have an angled pocket opening. ** You may have to tweak these measurements slightly for a different size, but they will get you really close. (Original design lines are in grey pencil, newly drafted lines are in blue pencil)

Pocket alteration 1.2

Next up you’ll need to draw a new pocket interfacing piece. Simply trace your new angled pocket edge and draw a matching line 1in away to create the new piece.

Interfacing collage

 

2. Lengthen for a higher waist

I measured down 1 1/2in from top of the side seams (front & back pieces) to mark my lengthen line. Your lengthen line should be perpendicular to the grain line. Cut and spread 1in (or more). I’m short-waisted so 1in was plenty for me.

I chose not to lengthen my pocket piece. If you choose to, I suggest lengthening below the angled pocket opening, so you don’t skew those proportions.

3. Move the fly

We’re mostly just switching up the construction a little. Pin or mark just above the pocket on the side seam. Stitch the side seam closed from bottom(hem) up to your marking and back stitch to reinforce.  The dot marking on the fly pieces will match up to the top of your side seam stitching.

Pin mark

In the pattern instructions the left fly attaches to the left (as worn) center front and the right fly piece attaches to the right (as worn) center front. Instead, you will attach the Left fly to the Front pant/short piece and the Right fly to the Back pant/short piece.

Fly pieces

Fly pieces inside view

Follow the pattern instructions for completing the fly and button closure. The fly pieces as cut will extend up past the waistline, simply trim any excess. Once you have the fly completed, you’ll want to add a securing bar tack through the two fly pieces. Make sure they are laying flat over each other like they do when the fly is closed. Pin together and sew the bar tack through the two layers.

Bar tack detail 1

Note: Moving the fly to the side will make the pattern notches on your waistband irrelevant, but you’ll be fine. Simply attach following the directions and ease any areas that need it.

Things to consider.

  1. I’ve made two Landers before, so I knew I would be ok with a shorter side fly.
  2. I made mine with stretch twill, so going down a size and the shorter fly still works for me.
  3. Raising the waist may require further alterations of your CB seam, darts, and possibly the waistband.

Attaching Slotted Buttons (aka Canadian buttons or bar buttons)

I turned to the Self Sewn Wardrobe facebook group for direction with these.  I got the suggestions that these are attached with a ribbon, twill tape, or self fabric running through them and an example pic from a rtw jacket with this type of closure. I haven’t found a tutorial to verify that I did this properly, but this will get you started. If you have any suggestions, I’d love to hear them.

Your ribbon will run right down the middle of your buttons, so mark your button placement to the outside of each button so you can still see the markings after laying down the ribbon. Don’t skip the marking because we’ll be shifting those buttons up and down on the ribbon as we sew.

placket collage

Cut your ribbon about 1.5 times the length of the fly and slide all the buttons onto the bottom of the ribbon. Starting at the top of the fly. Slide one button up to the top of the ribbon leaving about 5/8in of ribbon extending above the top of the button. Position your button to line up with your placement mark, fold under the top edge of the ribbon by 1/4in and pin the ribbon in place. Also pin or mark your ribbon just above the top of your button. Slide the button down and out of the way to make two bar tacks. One along the top folded edge of the ribbon and the second on the marking for the top of the button. Straight stitch along the edges of the ribbon between the bar tacks.

Slide the button back up into position and get ready to experiment with how much slack you’ll need in the ribbon. I tried using a match stick, chop stick, and a couple other things before settling on the shaft of my seam ripper. Place your spacer beneath your button keeping the button centered with your button placement marking. Pin down the ribbon to line up with the bottom edge of the button. Your next bar tack will go where you pin. Remove your spacer and test how well the button fits through the button holes. Adjust as needed. When you have the slack determined and the ribbon pinned, slide the button up as far as you can and make a bar tack where you pinned. Your first button is now secured.

Button detail

Repeat this process for the rest of your buttons. Positioning your button with the ribbon flat, marking and sewing the top bar tack along the top edge of the button, repositioning the button with your spacer to get your slack, and marking and sewing the bottom bar tack. If you have a presser foot that will fit, straight stitch along the ribbon edges between your buttons. (I couldn’t make that work.)

Slotted Button Detail 1

After all your buttons are secured, leave enough ribbon to extend to the bottom of the fly and straight stitch along the ribbon edges to secure. I was also able to catch the bottom of my ribbon in a bar tack that I used to secure my fly pieces together. Trim any excess.

Next time I’d do the top button with a separate piece of ribbon. I think I’d like the looks of that better. I’d also apply my buttons before attaching the waistband, then I could secured top edge of the ribbon in a seam and have a nicer finish.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

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Lander Shorts – Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best from mahlicadesigns.

 

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my sewing friends joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

WMIB Label 4

Arielle from Seen & Sewn Patterns has joined me in making up the Lander Shorts for this week’s challenge. Please also check out Arielle’s blog here to see her super cute version. Isn’t this print she choose wonderful?

Arielle collage

The Lander Shorts are a high waist button fly short/pant pattern with optional expansion pack for a zipper fly.

Lander wm 2

I’ve already made a pair of Lander shorts (here) and pants (here) and was ready to try something different with this pair. My inspiration started with a picture of a side button closure and grew into a board of ideas for what I’m calling my Sail Away outfit.

Lander wm 4

The details I settled on for the shorts are an angled pocket opening, button fly closure moved to the side seam, and a high waist.

I’m wearing a Durango tank from Hey June that I modified with a lower neckline and a contrast piece at the lower bodice. Totally forgot to get photos of that- geesh.

** I’ll have a seperate blog post soon to walk you through how to make these modifications. (Find the tutorial here)

Lander wm 1

Lander wm 5

The Pattern: Lander Shorts made in size 6 and modified as described.

The Fabric: Khaki stretch twill from Simply By Ti. I only needed 1 yard!

Lander wm closeup

So, who do you think made their Landers the best?

Please visit Seen & Sewn Patterns for more pictures of Arielle’s version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both blogs, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can also take a look at the Bronte Tee, Shoreline Boatneck, Sorbetto Top,  Greenwood Tank, Cheyenne Tunic, Chi Town Chinos, and  Ladies Caroline Dress that were part of past Who Made It Best challenges.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.

Tabor Vneck and Lander Shorts

Have you seen the newly released Tabor Vneck from Sew House Seven?

There are many options to choose from in the pattern, but I was most drawn to the cropped sweater version. I thought it would look great with a pair of Lander Shorts I’ve been planning.

Tabor 3

 

Tabor 1

About the Tabor

The Pattern: Tabor Vneck view 5 (cropped sweater) in size medium with no alterations. This is an easy pattern to put together, but setting in the point on a Vneck can be tricky to do without puckers. The pattern instructions walk you through a construction technique for the V that I’ve had the most success with.

The Fabric: The Tabor was sewn using baby French Terry in two toned burgundy from Simply by Ti Fabrics*. This view of the Tabor is made for sweater knits with stretch and the fabric works perfectly. I have the stretch that is required and the baby FT is light enough for spring weather and drapes well.

Tabor 7

 

Tabor 6

 

About the Landers

The pattern: Lander Shorts from True Bias Patterns in size 10. No alterations.

The fabric: Stretch Denim from Simply by Ti Fabrics*. I did not size down to account for the stretch and they fit just fine for photos, but after a hot humid day at a Florida amusement park they were feeling a little loose. I’d go down a size next time. I’d recommend starting with your regular size and slim down at the side seams if needed (this fitting step is included in the pattern instructions anyway).

Tabor 8

Tabor 4

 

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I received complimentary fabrics for this post from the Simply By Ti shop to use in exchange for sharing it with you.

You might also like: The Lander Pants I made for the Breaking Ground Blog Tour.

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VS Pattern Showdown: 5 Women’s Tank Patterns Go Head to Head

Welcome back to VS.

An occasional series here at mahlicadesigns with the aim of pairing similar style patterns against each other in a friendly showdown to see which pattern better suits me, all while working through my pattern stash.

 

Today I’m comparing 5 knit tank tops:

Dahlia Tank from Leala Jeyne

Durango Tank from Hey June Handmade

Greenwood Tank from Straight Stitch Designs

Idyllwild Tee from Itch to Stitch

Lago Tank from Itch to Stitch

VS. Tanks front collage 2

The Dahlia Tank is “a well-fitting tank top for use with knit fabrics in cup sizes A-E. The scoop neckline is finished with bindings, not bands, for a professional look. Hip and crop lengths.”

The Durango Tank is a “casual sleeveless shirt with a center back seam and longer flared hem… is fitted at the shoulder and bust and loose through the waist and hip for an easy fit.”

The Greenwood Tank features “a wide open neckline and two back options.”

The Idyllwild Tee is a “fitted t-shirt and dress pattern… jam-packed with options… you can literally make 42 garments with different looks!”

The Lago Tank is a relaxed fit racerback tank with slightly scooped neckline.

For all my tanks I used the 10oz cotton lycra solids from Simply By Ti. I’ve used this C/L in many projects as I love the weight and quality (here & here & here & here & here). As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I received complimentary fabrics for this post from the Simply By Ti shop to use in exchange for sharing it with you.

Now let’s compare.

VS. Tanks front collage 1

VS. Tanks front collage 2

Left to right: Dahlia in Cobalt, Durango in Eggplant, Greenwood in Tomato Red, Idyllwild in Fuchsia, Lago in Turquiose

Instructions.

Dahlia: Beginner friendly and easy to follow. I still managed to finish the neck and arm opening with a band instead of a binding by mistake.

Durango: Beginner friendly and easy to follow.

Greenwood: Beginner friendly and easy to follow. Link to video demonstrating binding technique.

Idyllwild: Beginner friendly and easy to follow. Pattern notches included to line up curved side seams and position the bands.

Lago: Beginner friendly and easy to follow. Pattern notches included to line up curved side seams and position the bands.

VS tanks back collage 1

VS tanks back collage 2

Left to right: Dahlia in Cobalt, Durango in Eggplant, Greenwood in Tomato Red, Idyllwild in Fuchsia, Lago in Turquiose

Fit.

Dahlia: Size small graded to medium at the hip per my measurements. A little bit of bunching at the shoulder seam area.

Durango:  Size 10 per my measurements. Dropped shoulder adjustment of 3/8in was critical to reduce gaping. I don’t think I stretched the binding around the armscye, enough as you can see there is still gaping going on there.

Greenwood: Size 10 per my measurements. Shortened front and back straps by 1/4in and then did a 1/4in dropped shoulder adjustment.  Shortened 1/2in at hemline.

Idyllwild: Size small graded to medium at hips. Shoulder seam sits back about 1/4in from my shoulder point. A 1/4in dropped shoulder adjustment to the front bodice should fix that. Neckband pattern piece seems a tad too long around the CF curve. It will need to be shortened 1/2in.

Lago: Size 6 graded to 8 at the hips. No shoulder adjustment needed (due to racerback shape?) Bands fit perfectly.

** For all these patterns I’ll need a sway back adjustment and to grade the back piece a little larger at the hip to account for my full seat.

VS tanks side collage 3

VS tanks side collage 2

Left to right: Dahlia in Cobalt, Durango in Eggplant, Greenwood in Tomato Red, Idyllwild in Fuchsia, Lago in Turquiose

Style.

Dahlia: Standard and cropped options. I like the gently curved hem.

Durango:  CB seam allows for easy swayback adjustment if needed and potentially easier to use up your remnants. Swing style minimizes the need to grade for wider hips. Racerback bra needed.

Greenwood: Wider scooped neckline. Straps give great coverage.

Idyllwild: Sleeveless style gives more coverage across the shoulders.

Lago: Cute racerback curves, but racerback bra needed.

VS tanks side collage 2

Left to right: Dahlia in Cobalt, Durango in Eggplant, Greenwood in Tomato Red, Idyllwild in Fuchsia, Lago in Turquiose

Investment.

Dahlia: $11  Two length options included.

Durango: $0 One view included.

Greenwood: $10-$12 Two neckline options included.

Idyllwild: $10 includes multiple sleeve, neckline, and length options.

Lago: $0 One view included.

Durango collage

For me, the Durango is the winner. I like the fit through the body and the pattern just needs a little tweaking to adjust for my swayback.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagramBloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

This post contains affiliate links, if you purchase through my links I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

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Ladies Caroline Dress- Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best, a series on mahlicadesigns.

 

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my fellow bloggers joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

Ladies Caroline side by side collage 2

Jillayne from Hazelnut Handmade has joined me in making up the Ladies Caroline Dress for this week’s challenge. The Ladies Caroline Dress has a fitted bodice with gathered or pleated skirt, with several sleeve and neckline options. Please check out Jillayne’s blog here to see what she made.

The Caroline Dress pattern was one of the first pdf’s I ever purchased, but at the time I thought it was above my skill level so it got set aside. How things have changed; my sewing skills have improved to a point where I found this pattern quite easy to make.

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 4

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 1

I didn’t notice this in my muslin, but I got some serious gapping in the back armscye. I took out a 1/2in wedge along the shoulder seam for this version and altered my pattern to take out an additional 1/2in wedge across the shoulder blade if I should choose to make the pattern again.

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 7

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 8

 

The Pattern: Ladies Caroline Dress made in size 10 and altered as described.

The Fabric: Robert Kauffman’s London Calling primrose pansy cotton lawn. I used 1.75 yards.

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 9

So, who do you think made their Ladies Caroline Dress the best? Please visit Hazelnut Handmade for more pictures and details on her version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both blogs, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can also take a look at the Bronte Tee, Shoreline Boatneck, Sorbetto Top,  Greenwood Tank, Cheyenne Tunic, and Chi Town Chinos that were part of past Who Made It Best challenges.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.

Breaking Ground with True Bias Lander Pants

Some patterns just stand out as instant must haves. The Lander Pants were that for me and by all the Landers I see on Instagram, for many others too.

After making my Coffee House Pants from Blue Dot Patterns, I was all-in on the idea that I could pull off a wide leg pant, so why the heck not try the Landers. Plus that button fly and slightly higher waist looks so stylish.

Lander 3

Lander 4

I don’t have a lot of experience sewing pants and those that I have made have been pretty time intensive due to details like topstitching, welt pockets, or my pattern hacking. Sewing the Landers really helped put into perspective that sewing pants could be a pretty quick project.

Lander 1

Lander button fly close up

I’m Breaking Ground on these also by sewing my first button fly. Seriously, it’s not difficult, but I’m always apprehensive about screwing up button holes.

The Pattern: Lander Pants & Shorts from True Bias. I made a straight size 10 shortened by 2in and did not need to do my typical full seat adjustment. I did sew a muslin, but you might not need to do one. The pattern includes a 1in seam allowance on the outseam to allow for fitting. You be the judge.

I found the drafting and pattern instructions are on par with the better indie designers. My only criticism is the order of construction has you sew the legs together front and back before working on the fly. That’s a lot of bulk to be maneuvering while working on the fly.

Lander 6

Lander 5

The Fabric: It’s a mystery! Pulled deep from my stash, inherited years ago, origins unknown. Some sort of natural fiber slub woven. It was perfect in my mind for the Landers.

Lander 7

 

Thanks for reading about my Breaking Ground project today.

Please visit today’s other bloggers in the Breaking Ground Blog Tour:

Sewing Vortex, Sewing A La Carte, Little Heart Threads, The Sewing Scientist

You can read more about the Breaking Ground Blog Tour, see all the bloggers in the tour, learn how to participate, and enter the giveaway Here.

As always, thanks for stopping by today.

B6388 Top for the Red White and Pink Tour

27368405_10212519528197898_3611939951619528043_o

As I moved my cold weather tops into my dresser last fall, I found myself unable to descern what was what in the stacks of grey, black, and navy. Man did I need some variety, so I’ve worked on addeding some color (here & here) and print (here).

Fuchsia 8 wm

When I was selecting fabric for my next Simply By Ti Ambassador* project, I thought I’d go in an unexpected direction by choosing a super bright pink. I haven’t worn pink in at least a decade, so I’m not even sure if it works for me, but here we go. What do you think?

Fuchsia 5

I don’t usually dress on theme for holidays, but I think I’m going to be pretty in pink this Valentines day. The Red White and Pink tour will be full of ideas for you to check out along the theme -keep reading to the end to see the full tour.

The Pattern:  B6388 view C in a size medium with no alterations.  I’d made the dress view previously, so there was no guesswork as to fit or size.

Just after I had finished my top version, Elle Gee posted about two dresses she made with the pattern. I think I need to try some color mixing next.

Fuchsia 6 label

The Fabric:  Fuchsia French Terry from Simply by Ti. I’ve sewn with the French Terry from the shop several times and I just love it. It’s soft, has just the right body, and is easy to sew with.

 

We’re sharing Red White and Pink all month.
Let’s get inspired!

February 1st: Sewing By Ti (intro),  Mahlica Designs
2nd: Sewing With D
3rd: Sewing With Sarah
Sunday, February 4th: Tenille’s Thread
5th: My Heart will Sew On
6th: Kathy Kwilts and More
7th: Stitched By Jennie
8th: EYMM
9th: With Love In Every Stitch
10th: The Bear and the Pea Atelier
Sunday, February 11th: Our Play Place
12th: My Sewing Roots
13th: Margarita on the Ross
14th: Very Blissful
15th: Seams Sew Lo
16th: Sew Sew Ilse
17th: Aurora Designs
Sunday, February 18th: Sewing Scientist
19th: Manning the Machine
20th: The Fairy Dust Bin
21st: Hazelnut Handmade
22nd: Kate Will Knit
23rd: Lulu & Celeste
24th: Flaxfield Sewing
Sunday, February 25th: Twinado Alley
26th: Ma Moose
27th: Auschick Sews
28th: Oak Blue Designs

 

 

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.