My Montavilla Dress for Minerva

I’ve been on a small Sew House Seven sewing kick for a while. I’ve made up the Free Range Slacks, a short sleeve Merlo Field tee, and an Underwood Tank and Dress. I’m sure I’ll be making another Toaster Sweater soon too.

Today I’d like to give you a look at my latest Sew House Seven creation, the Montavilla Dress that I made for the Minerva blogger network. You can read the full details here.

Until next time,

Melissa E of mahlicadesigns

Layered V-Neck Tutorial from mahlicadesigns

I ran across a picture of a v-neck tee a while back that had a double layered neck band and added it to my collection of interesting clothing details to try someday. Unlike most things in my little collection, I did spend some time working this one out using the Tabor V-neck pattern and I’ve put together a tutorial to share with you.

For my layered V-neck I used oatmeal Baby French Terry from Simply By Ti. The baby french terry is light enough to drape nicely in the Tabor and there’s barely any bulk in the double layered neckband. When choosing fabric for your project, experiment by folding layers together to see if you like how they look.

I’m really happy with the overall look I achieved with the layered neckband and this color has been a very useful addition to my wardrobe. If I were to do it again though, I might not use the Tabor pattern combined with this technique. The V on the Tabor is pretty deep and using a narrower band than the pattern calls for at the center front makes me feel a little exposed.

Maybe, but probably not, I’ll put on the wider band that the Tabor calls for (because I love this top) and make another layered V-neck using another pattern.

Layered V-Neck Tutorial

The measurements provided are based on the Tabor V-neck size 8. As a guideline, the outerband should come down and cover approximately 2/3 the length of the front of your v-neck, shoulder to center front. My innerband starts at the shoulder and goes to center front. You can also cut the inner band to fit the entire neckband if you are not concerned about bulk.
You can adapt the technique to your favorite V-neck tee pattern, but you’ll need to adjust the band lengths I’ve given to fit.

Cut your custom bands:

Innerband cut 2:   2.25in X 14in    (3/4in finished width)

Outerband cut 1:   3in X 25in    (1 1/8in finished width)

Interface the center V on the bodice of your tee and sew the front and back together at the shoulders.

Apply fusible web along the short ends of the outerband piece. Fold back the short ends wrong sides together by 1/2in and press to secure with the fusible web.

Mark the center (center back) and mark the shoulder seams 5in away from center back on the outerband.

Sew the innerband pieces together forming a V at center front. Using a 3/8in seam allowance, insert and baste the innerband into place along the V. Don’t baste the entire length of the inner bands, just a few inches around the center V.

Starting at center back, leaving the outerband unfolded, pin the single layer of the outerband in place along the neckline. Stretch the outerband slightly as you pin in place from center back to the shoulder seam. The bands don’t need to be eased in from shoulder to center front.

Next, pin the innerband in place along the bottom portion of the neckline up to the shoulder seam. The innerband should overlap the single layer of the outerband.  Trim away any excess length of the inner band that extends past the shoulder seam.

Lastly, fold over the outerband, sandwiching the innerband within and repin all layers as needed along the entire neckline. Remember the outerband is eased slightly between the shoulders and center back.

If you want to check your proportions first, baste the entire neck band into place (innerband and outerband now functioning as one unit) using a 3/8in seam allowance.

Sew/serge your layered neckband into place using 3/8in seam allowance. Complete the construction of your tee per the pattern instructions.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

You might also like: Tabor V-Neck and Lander shorts

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Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

Plaid Trousers for Fall

I’ve finally added a pair of plaid pants to my fall wardrobe.

My inspiration was the newly released McCalls 8006 pattern with a pair of plaid trousers featured on the front. The plaid plus the trending high waist and sash belt looks like a perfect pairing. When I found the plaid viscose from The Fabric Guys, it was all settled, or so I thought.

Read about what actually happened on the Sewcial Network blog featuring the plaid tartan from The Fabric Guys. You can read the full details here.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

**As an ambassador for The Fabric Guys I receive complementary fabric to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you. These are my opinions about it.

You might also like my Corduroy Chi Town Skirt

Christmas Polar Bears for Minerva

I finished the Christmas Eve pajamas for the little guy early this year and I’ve added a coordinating pillow case that will double as a gift bag for the pajama set. Many thanks to Minerva.com for supplying me with fabrics for the project.

Here’s a little preview, but you can see the full details over on the Minerva blog. You can read the full details here.

 

Thanks for reading and visiting me over on the Minerva Blog

Chi Town Skirt in Corduroy for The Fabric Guys

In an effort to spark some motivation to sew, I put together a small sewing plan to round out my fall wardrobe. I included a Chi Town Skirt, a couple pairs of pants and some easy to make tops.

I’m working through the bottoms slowly and have pretty much given up on the idea of making the tops. I guess making a plan didn’t really work to get the fires lit under my sewjo after all.

 

I did add a wonderful rust corduroy skirt to my wardrobe though. Here’s a sneak peek of the Corduroy Chi Town skirt that I made for the Sewcial Network blog featuring corduroy from The Fabric Guys. You can read the full details here.

 

 

On the topic of corduroy, I needed a refresher on sewing with it, so I compiled all the tips I gathered up into one helpful post to share. Click through to see.

11 Tips for Sewing with Corduroy

Until next time,

Melissa E of mahlicadesigns

CHENILLE Sweater for Minerva

My fabric stash and my dresser drawers can attest to the fact that charcoal grey knit is my spirit fabric. I’m sticking to what I love with the grey sweater knit fabric that I chose to make a Chenille Sweater from Kommatia Patterns (now Studio Calicot).

Today you can read about the Chenille that I made for the Minerva blog. You can see the full details here.

Until next time,

Melissa E of mahlicadesigns

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ITS Spotlight on the Hepburn Turtleneck

Today I’m contributing to the ITS Spotlight September with three versions of the Hepburn Turtleneck from Itch to Stitch (ITS). I made my Hepburns in three fabric types to show off the different looks you can achieve with one well designed pattern. (Keep reading for tour details, a discount code, and a giveaway)

Version 1: Ribbed Knit.  Horizontal Stretch: 100%  Vertical Stretch: 60%  Weight: 9 oz.  Cotton/Rayon/Spandex Blend

My first attempt at sewing with knits about 8 years ago was with a ribbed knit on my sewing machine. I had no idea what I was doing and the result was a complete fiasco. I haven’t touched ribbed knit again until this project.

With a little bit of experience under my belt I had a few ideas on how to do it better. I spent a little time tweaking my overlocker settings trying to get them right. I felt like I was circling around my target but not hitting the bulls eye.

Finally I just googled for some suggestions. I got lucky when the first place I looked was using my exact machine. When I  adjusted the settings to match up to Indie Sews’ recommendations, overlocking in direction of greatest stretch worked perfectly. I then adjusted the differential feed back toward the 1 setting (feed dogs moving equally) when overlocking along the grainline. I used my walking foot and a lengthened zigzag stitch on my regular sewing machine for the hems.

Rib knit conquered !

Version 2: Sweater knit. Horizontal Stretch: 95% Vertical Stretch: 25% light weight.

I’ve sewn with this sweater knit before (here), so I was able to knock it out on my overlocker and then using a walking foot and lengthened zigzag stitch for the hems on my sewing machine. I think I need to pair this one with a cardigan to get a professorial look.

Version 3: Double Brushed Poly. Horizontal Stretch: 100% Vertical Stretch: 75% light weight. 100% Polyester.

I made this one specifically for layering. I think it will look great with my cardigans without being bulky and as a base layer for some outdoor winter activities.

The Pattern Hepburn Turtleneck from Itch to Stitch made in a straight size 8.

The Hepburn is on SALE TODAY ONLY as part of the ITS Spotlight Tour. Use code 916itsblogtour25 to save 25% off the Hepburn Turtleneck. To find more patterns on sale, visit all of today’s bloggers. Check the tour every day, for daily discounts.

The Fabrics Striped rib knit and double brushed poly from Boho fabrics. Grey sweater knit from DG Patterns.

I modeled my Hepburns with my well loved Lindy Petal skirt and Liana Jeans both from Itch to Stitch.

**This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

The ITS September Spotlight Itch to Stitch Blog Tour features these talented sewists:

September 16th 
September 17th 
September 18th 
September 19th 
September 20th 

Visit our Sponsors and enter our Rafflecopter Giveaway for a chance to win one of 2 amazing prize packages:

Prize # 1
Itch to Stitch: 3 PDF patterns of choice
Raspberry Creek Fabrics: $100 Store Credit
D&H Fabrics Co: $50 Store Credit
Simply By Ti: Prize of $20 Store Credit

So Sew English Fabrics: Prize of $40 Store Credit
Sly Fox Fabrics: $25 Store Credit

Prize #2
Itch to Stitch: 3 PDF patterns of choice
Beautiful Textiles: $100 Store Credit
D&H Fabrics Co: $50 Store Credit
Surge Fabric Shop: $20 Store Credit
Knitpop: $50 Knitcoin Credit

Padded Headphone Case for Sew Long Summer

I’ve made a padded headphone case to say Sew Long Summer and hello to back to school. This is my second post this week for the Sew Long Summer blog tour I’m hosting (read on to see more about the tour).

Headphones are a required school supply, so after the little guy broke two sets of headphones last year, I’m hoping a padded case will keep the newest set in one piece.

I didn’t want to reinvent the wheel, so I used the Taco Zipper Pouch tutorial and template (printed at 125%) that I wrote for On The Cutting Floor last year. I added a lining and batting to all my layers and cut my base and zipper strip to 3 3/4in width to account for the depth of the headphones. The little guy wanted “just one” handle, so I added that in too.

The little guy likes the Minions, but I think he couldn’t care less about the case. Oh well. My fingers are crossed that these headphones will survive the year.

Thanks for reading today. Now about the tour.

Sew Long Summer is all about getting those transitional wardrobe pieces ready; finishing up all those things we meant to make this summer; and well, basically whatever Sew Long Summer means to you.

The full tour includes these talented sewists, so I hope you’ll follow along and comment on their posts this week.

Sept. 9th   Sewing A La Carte,  mahlicadesigns, Sewing Vortex, Sewing With Sarah

Sept. 10th The Bear and Pea Atelier, Auschick Sews, Stitched by Jennie, Miss Marah Sewn

Sept. 11th Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, A Rose Tinted World, mahlicadesigns

Sept. 12th Little Heart Threads, Lulu and Celeste, The Crafting Fiend, Fils Anddraps

Sept. 13th  Petite Font, Sew 4 Five, The Sewing Scientist, Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, Kitty Makes It

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

Sew Long Summer, Hello Astoria and Pirate Pencil

I say Sew Long Summer by sewing up new fall outfits. My newest outfit is the Astoria Sweater from Seamwork Magazine and the Pirate Pencil Skirt from Patterns 4 Pirates.

I knew they would make a colorful fall outfit that I can also leverage for my business casual office. (Oh hey, keep reading to learn about the Sew Long Summer blog tour)

The Astoria

This is my first time trying a pattern from Seamwork magazine. My first impression of the Astoria was it’s overkill of information except for an accurate description of the two versions. I had to dig to find that the versions are long sleeve and 3/4 sleeve. (The 3/4 sleeve descriptor is actually on the pattern piece inventory- nowhere else) I made a straight size Med per my measurements and I’d say it’s a good fit.

The Pirate Pencil Skirt

The Pirate Pencil is a free pattern, but is not lacking in the time and effort put into regular quality patterns. My only critique is that the print instructions don’t have you print pages 18 & 23 for the above knee version. You will need them. The only thing I’d change is adding a little length for next time.

I used stash fabrics to make both pieces; a striped ponte knit to make up the Pirate Pencil and a textured double knit for the Astoria.

Thanks for reading today.

 

The full tour includes these talented sewists, so I hope you’ll follow along and comment on their posts this week.

Sept. 9th   Sewing A La Carte,  mahlicadesigns, Sewing Vortex, Sewing With Sarah

Sept. 10th The Bear and Pea Atelier, Auschick Sews, Stitched by Jennie, Miss Marah Sewn

Sept. 11th Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, A Rose Tinted World, mahlicadesigns

Sept. 12th Little Heart Threads, Lulu and Celeste, The Crafting Fiend, Fils Anddraps

Sept. 13th  Petite Font, Sew 4 Five, The Sewing Scientist, Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, Kitty Makes It

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

Sew Long Summer blog tour 2019

Welcome to Sew Long Summer blog tour 2019, my annual tour to to say goodbye to all things summer and get ready for fall and winter.

We’re going to have a fun one this year.

A nice group of sewing bloggers are going to share with you how we say “Sew Long Summer” (read on for details)

Sew Long Summer is all about getting those transitional wardrobe pieces ready, finishing up all those things we meant to make this summer, and basically whatever Sew Long Summer means to you.

Today’s Sew Long Summer bloggers are:

  Sewing A La Carte,  mahlicadesigns, Sewing Vortex, Sewing With Sarah

Please stop by their blogs and share what you think of their efforts by leaving them a comment!

The full tour includes these talented sewists, so I hope you’ll follow along this week.

Sept. 9th   Sewing A La Carte,  mahlicadesigns, Sewing Vortex, Sewing With Sarah

Sept. 10th The Bear and Pea Atelier, Auschick Sews, Stitched by Jennie, Miss Marah Sewn

Sept. 11th Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, A Rose Tinted World, mahlicadesigns

Sept. 12th Little Heart Threads, Lulu and Celeste, The Crafting Fiend, Fils Anddraps

Sept. 13th  Petite Font, Sew 4 Five, The Sewing Scientist, Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, Kitty Makes It

As always, thanks for reading along with me.

You can follow me on instagramBloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

Underwood Tank and Dress

Last summer we had a week of 100 degree temps, the upper level of our home was in the 90s, and my husband was trying so hard to get our evaporation cooler working. It was one of those weeks where we have serious discussions about if it is worth the big money to install air conditioning.

So when Peggy of Sew House Seven put out a call to test her new Underwood Tank and Dress pattern and mentioned that she had those hot summer days in mind when she designed it, a chord was struck in my mind. A barely there dress- yes, yes please!

My first version (the test version) I made up in a floral rayon spandex that I received in a prize box from Simply By Ti. I’m not big on florals or pink but I thought this would make a great nightgown and it does.

My second version was the tank option (final pattern) made up in the Bordeaux Organic Bamboo jersey from DG Patterns*. This final version of the pattern has the straps shifted slightly outward toward the shoulder. I honestly can’t tell the difference between the final and the beta version. Both cover bra straps so I’m good. The pattern includes options for a single fold hem finish at the neckline and armscyes or a facing. I really like the low bulk option of the single fold. I think it works really nicely to make this a light weight dress and top.

So far, this summer in Colorado hasn’t been a scorcher, but I’m ready none the less. What do you sew to cope with the summer heat?

The Pattern: The Underwood Tank and Dress. Knee length dress and tank versions made in size 10 with no alterations. I usually have to shorten everything, but I liked where this dress and tank falls. Keep an eye out for expanded sizes in the future for this pattern.

The Fabric: Organic bamboo jersey in Bordeaux from DG Patterns shop and Floral rayon spandex from Simply by Ti.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

This post may contain affiliate links that are denoted*. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

Crossback Tracey Bee for Seen & Sewn Together blog tour & giveaway

I made a cropped Tracey Bee top earlier this year and mentioned that I ought to make a sleeveless version for summer too. Well looky looky, I actually did it. Not only that, but I took a creative spin with the pattern for the Seen & Sewn Together blog tour this week. (Keep reading for giveaway and blog tour details)

I wanted to make two modifications to the Tracey Bee.

First off making it sleeveless and a little less cropped. This was no effort at all, I simply bound the existing arm hole opening with a bias tape turned to the inside and lengthened the cropped version by 2.5in at the hem line.

The second modification I wanted was to make a crossover with triangular points near the center back. I traced off the back pattern piece to make my adjustments and drew and redrew the angle several times. I was trying so hard to make it an equilateral triangle, but I just couldn’t make it work out. I don’t think anyone will notice.

Here’s what I ended up with. Mark the point 3in out from center back and 11in down from the High Shoulder Point. Then draw the angled lines connecting to the existing shoulder point and 1/2in in from the hem line at the side seam. (1/2in in from the side seam to account for the seam allowance)

You’ll also want to make facing pieces for your new crossover edges. Cut them about 2 1/4in wide (match the width of the front facing) and as long as you need for your new back edges. I attached my front and back facings to the top and then made sure I caught the back facing with the side seams. Finally, when I turned up my hem I made sure it covered the side seam allowance neatly. I did find my facing tended to flip outward along the bottom portion, so I used about a 10in strip of fusible interfacing to tack it down. (I cut my facing about 1.5in wide. This is fine if you don’t mind a mismatch of the facings at the shoulder.)

 

The last step was adding the back buttons. I made sure that centerback was lined up on both pieces and then eyeballed the button placement. My buttons are tacked through both layers to keep everything in place. The Tacey Bee can slip over my head so no need to make button holes.

About the Tracey Bee**: I made a size Large per my bust measurement and made the above modifications. I used a cotton floral print shirting with a solid purple cotton(?) both from stash.

What do you think of my Tracey Bee? I’m wondering if the back buttons need to be larger.

Thanks for reading today, please read on about the blog tour & giveaway.

 

Welcome to the Seen & Sewn Together blog tour.

Arielle from Seen & Sewn Patterns is creating patterns with a focus on encouraging people to join the #handmaderevolution by sewing their own handmade wardrobe.

A nice group of sewing bloggers have joined together to share with you how we’ve taken the Seen & Sewn Patterns and let our creativity loose with them. We want to inspire you whether you’re just starting or well on your way to building your handmade wardrobe.

The extra fun part for you is that we have a prize pack giveaway from Seen & Sewn Patterns that you can enter below. The prize pack for US residents includes 1 pattern of choice, a Slow Fashion Tee, and a Slow Fashion Pin. For our international readers the prize pack includes a copy of all Seen & Sewn PDF Patterns. Bonus! All entrants will receive a coupon code for a $1 pattern of choice -so make sure your email is up to date in your profile when entering.

The tour includes these talented sewists, so I hope you’ll follow along this week.

Monday June 17th

Sew 4 Five, Sewing A la Carte, Aurora Designs

Tuesday June 18th

Idle Sunshine, That’s Sew Lily, House of Estrella

Wednesday June 19th

Mahlicadesigns, Sewing with D, Fee Bricolo, Aurora Designs

Thursday June 20th

Let’s Go Hobby, Sewing from Scratch, Craftstyle Living, Mama You Can Make It

Friday June 21st

Claire Cruse, Make It Sew with the Bear and Pea Atelier, Sew Cute Couture by Kathy

Enter to win something good here!

 

 

**This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby**

Seen & Sewn Together blog tour begins

Welcome to the Seen & Sewn Together blog tour.

Arielle from Seen & Sewn Patterns is creating patterns with a focus on encouraging people to join the #handmaderevolution by sewing their own handmade wardrobe.

A nice group of sewing bloggers have joined together to share with you how we’ve taken the Seen & Sewn Patterns and let our creativity loose with them. We want to inspire you whether you’re just starting or well on your way to building your handmade wardrobe.

The extra fun part for you is that we have a prize pack giveaway from Seen & Sewn Patterns that you can enter below. The prize pack for US residents includes 1 pattern of choice, a Slow Fashion Tee, and a Slow Fashion Pin. For our international readers the prize pack would include a copy of all Seen & Sewn PDF Patterns. Bonus! All readers will receive a coupon code for up to two patterns of choice for $1 each (expires 6/30/19)

The tour includes these talented sewists, so I hope you’ll follow along this week.

Monday June 17th

Sew 4 Five, Sewing A la Carte, Aurora Designs

Tuesday June 18th

Idle Sunshine, That’s Sew Lily, House of Estrella

Wednesday June 19th

Mahlicadesigns, Sewing with D, Fee Bricolo, Aurora Designs

Thursday June 20th

Let’s Go Hobby, Sewing from Scratch, Craftstyle Living, Mama You Can Make It

Friday June 21st

Claire Cruse, Make It Sew with the Bear and Pea Atelier, Sew Cute Couture by Kathy

 

Enter to win something good here!

Viewridge top- pattern review

This spring I’m finally getting around to starting in on those woven tanks I’ve been meaning to make for the last three summers. It feels like I have oodles of patterns in the stash to try, but I’m starting with the Viewridge Top from Straight Stitch Designs that I won in last year’s Indie Pattern month on The Monthly Stitch.

 

I like loose fitting tops for summer, but gathers and pleats seem to add too much volume at the bust for my taste. The Viewridge does have small gathers at the front, but I think they are nicely balanced by structured side and yoke pieces.

Viewridge view B includes small gathers at center front. Photo from Straight Stitch Designs

The Viewridge should be pretty easy for an advanced beginner sewist due to the use of bias tape to finish the neckline and arm hole and making even gathers. Even so, I managed to make it difficult on myself. I didn’t press my fabric when I pulled it back out of my stash. Slightly wrinkled shifty and slippery rayon wovens are not fun to cut and I ended up with one piece slightly off grain. I definitely had some hair pulling as I tried to figure out why one piece ended up slightly lopsided (because it was off grain and wrinkly) and how to fix it.

As I was working through that, Rachel of Oakblue Designs was sharing her success in cutting the same type of fabric after treating it with a spray stabilizer. Noted.

I also found a small error on the pattern at the shoulder. The pattern marking doesn’t line up. Use them to help you know which pieces go together, but you’ll be fine lining up these pieces without them.

 

The Pattern: Viewridge Top from Straight Stitch Designs, view B in size 10 and shortened 2in at the adjustment line. I chose a size 10 based on my 37.5in bust measurement. The pattern instructions suggest that for larger cups sizes to try one size larger for the front pattern pieces than you use for the back pieces. I stuck with a straight 10 and feel like it fits well.  Overall I give the pattern an A, the instructions are well put together and the pattern is well drafted. That one misaligned pattern marking is easily overcome.

The Fabric: I picked up this floral rayon a year or so ago at Joann Fabrics. It’s beautiful and unfortunately it was only available for a moment.

 

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

You might like: My Ella Cami Set made in the same fabric.

 

Save For Later  Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

Parker Peplum Dress Hack

I’m back today with a simple hack I’ve done with the Parker Peplum Top pattern turning it into a dress and using the organic bamboo jersey from DG Patterns Shop*

Turning the Parker into a dress is quite simple. All you need is a circle skirt pattern or draft your own. There are tons of tutorials online to walk you through it.

I cut my circle skirt 19.5 in long and simply attached it to the bottom of the completed bodice. Viola, Parker Peplum Top is now a dress!

 

The Pattern: Parker Peplum top from Seen & Sewn Patterns in size medium. I added a circle skirt to make mine a dress. The Parker is a loose-fitting peplum with an option for a regular tee.

The Fabric: Organic bamboo jersey in black and white stripes. This was my first experience sewing with organic bamboo jersey. It’s quite similar to rayon jersey in its weight and drape, but this has a silkier smooth feel to it.

 

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use any way I like in exchange for sharing about it with you.

This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help fund for my sewing hobby.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

 

Lily Wrap Skirt- Let’s Sew Together

Designer Stitch is developing a set of Let’s Sew Together patterns that are designed to be sewn with a novice or friend that you can help along the way and share the love of sewing with.

The concept of having a line of patterns that are beginner friendly and bring people together is so lovely and Ann of Designer Stitch really hit the mark in the first implementation of her idea- the Lily Wrap Skirt.

Lily 1

Why the Lily works.

The design is interesting with the two sides that fold over each other, reminding me of origami and there’s something about the shaping that brings to mind mathematical curves and lines.

The Lily is not only a beginner friendly pattern but it is thoughtful in its design to make it easy to help someone brand new to sewing. For example: 1. A 1/4in seam allowance is used along the curved edge with the tab. The narrower seam allowance removes the need to clip along that curve saving time and construction steps. 2. Using hook and loop as a closure is simple and easy to apply and much quicker that other types of closures.  3. The need for fitting is minimized. You may need to adjust your darts, but no alteration to fit the width of your waist or hips is needed in this design.

The Lily also works because it’s a great project to use fun fabrics with and heck, a reversible skirt is fun for all ages.

buckle close up

Take your Lily to the next level

After making the Lily, I have a few notes on how to add some of your intermediate sewing skills to the project. 1. Upgrade your closures. I used buckles and a hidden slide clasp because I’m not planning on wearing mine as reversible. Sewing with D used some really cute buttons on hers. 2. Add a facing or interface your waistband edge. The waistband is a turned over edge, I think this is probably fine for most, but I just feel like I need a little more support in my waistband.

Lily 3

How to partake in the fun without a “novice” to sew with you.

The timing wasn’t right for me to work with someone who would need a little help learning to sew the Lily skirt, so I explored two other options. Firstly, I paired with Diane of Sewing with D to talk through the process using video chat in facebook messenger. Secondly, since Elizabeth of Elizabeth Made This and I live in the same city, we arranged to do a sewing meet up to work on our skirts together.

In the initial chat with Diane we talked about the pattern, fabrics, and ideas we were considering. We were able to work out any questions we had about the pattern, get a second opinion about fabric choices, and of course just chat about whatever. Our second video conversation took place after we both had most of the construction completed. We talked about what we might do differently the next time we made the pattern, shared pictures of button and buckles we were deciding on and gave our opinions, and of course more sewing chit-chat. Most of my sewing friends are online, so I really liked having the video chats with Diane, whom I’d been acquainted with for some time, but never actually spoken to or met with in person.

Meeting with Elizabeth in person was another fun way to work on the project. We shared some tea and cinnamon rolls and then as two moms with limited sewing time are want to do, got right down to the business of sewing. Now neither Elizabeth or I need hand holding, but it is really nice to be able to say “what are you doing here”, or “how are you coming along on this step” and so on. So much better than talking to myself in my sewing room.

Thanks Elizabeth and Diane for being my sewing buddies on this project!

Lily 2

The Pattern: Lily Wrap Skirt in size 4. I shortened mine by 4in to hit above my knee.

The Fabric: Navy cotton sateen and a cotton wax print from my stash.

 

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

This post may contain affiliate links, if you purchase through my links I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

Save For Later

Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

Breaking Ground with the Tracey Bee Top

I’m Breaking Ground with the Tracey Bee Top from new to me Seen & Sewn Patterns. I’m also hoping to break out of my ongoing sewing funk by using some energizing colors for spring in the midst of our ice and snow. (Oh hey, keep reading for tour details and to enter the giveaway)

 

What I like most about the Tracey Bee are the insert details. These create interesting design lines if you sew it up in a solid fabric and opportunities to mix fabrics if you like colorblocking.

I made my Tracey Bee with a rayon challis type of fabric. The drape is wonderful, but it did get a little clingey with static around my waist. Instead of a double fold hem, I decided to use a cotton bias binding and that seems to have helped the fabric stand away from my skin enough to resolve the problem.

 

The Pattern: Tracey Bee Top** in size L, cropped view. Due to the challenge of sewing inserts, I’d recommend this top for an advanced beginner or above. Other than the challenge inserts can offer, the pattern goes together easily. There was a small mismatch at the side seam when the dart was folded, so I sewed the dart at half the width and that resolved the mismatch and didn’t affect the fit for me in the least. (the designer is checking the pattern to correct).

The Fabric: Rayon woven paired with scraps of teal eyelet from the ole stash.

 

I’m still having a hard time getting excited about a next sewing project, but starting with fabrics in my stash that do give me some energy is a good strategy. I do wish it was warm enough to wear my spring projects instead of just looking at them.

The Braking Ground Blog Tour includes all these creatives… we hope you’ll visit us each day:

Monday March 11That’s Sew Lily, Sewing A La Carte, Mijn 11jes & ik

Tuesday March 12mahlicadesigns, Embrace Everyday, Jot Designs, auschick sews, Raising Stripling Warriors

Wednesday March 13Musings of A Seamstress, Very Blissful, Sew4Five, Just Sew Something, Hazelnut Handmade, Crafting Through Time, Tales From A Southern Mom

Thursday March 14Make It Sew with the Bear and Pea Atelier, Ronda B Handmade, SequioaLynn Sews, Sewing with D, The Sewing Goatherd, OOYAmade, My Golden Thimble, Custom Made by Laura

Friday March 15–  Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, Sewing Novice, Ronda B Handmade, Momma Bear Sews, MeMade, My Golden Thimble, Lulu & Celeste

Breaking News: our tour sponsor Phat Quarters is offering 2 patterns of choice from her pattern shop to one lucky winner.

Enter Here!

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We’d love to see how you’re Breaking Ground this month. Share with us what you’re working on by using the hashtag #BreakingGround2019 across social media.

As always, thanks for reading today.

**This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help fund for my sewing hobby.

Breaking Ground blog tour 2019- Kick Off!

Welcome to the Breaking Ground Blog Tour 2019. This year over 25 bloggers from around the world are joining with me to break new ground by trying a pattern designer that is new to them, try new techniques, new styles, or whatever way they want to push themselves. (Read on for Giveaway info)

The Full Tour includes all these creatives… we hope you’ll visit us each day:

Monday March 11That’s Sew Lily, Sewing A La Carte, Mijn 11jes & ik

Tuesday March 12mahlicadesigns, Embrace Everyday, Jot Designs, auschick sews, Raising Stripling Warriors

Wednesday March 13Musings of A Seamstress, Very Blissful, Sew4Five, Just Sew Something, Hazelnut Handmade, Crafting Through Time, Tales From A Southern Mom

Thursday March 14Make It Sew with the Bear and Pea Atelier, Ronda B Handmade, SequioaLynn Sews, Sewing with D, The Sewing Goatherd, OOYAmade, My Golden Thimble, Custom Made by Laura

Friday March 15–  Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, Sewing Novice, Ronda B Handmade, Momma Bear Sews, MeMade, My Golden Thimble, Lulu & Celeste

Breaking News: our tour sponsor Phat Quarters is offering 2 patterns of choice from her pattern shop to one lucky winner.

Enter Here!

***

We’d love to see how you’re Breaking Ground this month. Share with us what you’re working on by using the hashtag #BreakingGround2019 across social media.

Double the fun and join the Sew Alongs & Sewing Contests facebook group to sew along with the Breaking Ground theme for the entire month of March. In the group you’ll find support and encouragement for your projects and fun themed challenges.

As always, thanks for stopping by today.

Phinney Ridge Cardigan- featuring DG Patterns Cardigan Knit

I picked the Phinney Ridge Cardigan and the Magnuson Vest from Straight Stitch Designs as my prize in The Monthly Stitch‘s Indie Pattern Month contest. Of course I really wanted to sew up both right away, but the cardigan gets first try in this cozy cardigan sweater knit that I got from DG Patterns fabric shop.

I really like the V neck line and the deep cuffs of the Phinney Ridge. The cardigan looks really cute with buttons down the front, but I never button my cardigans and I’m afraid to do button holes on knits, so I go without.

To make my Phinney a little more interesting I used a faux leather for the cuffs and I just love it.

The Pattern: Phinney Ridge Cardigan from Straight Stitch Designs in size medium per her sizing chart and graded to size 12 at the hips. This one is an easy sew and well put together. The instructions have you sew each side of the neckband separately starting from the bottom and moving toward the center back of the neck. This thoughtful step keeps the neckline looking very nice. I basted each side and then finished the seam with my overlocker.

The Fabric:  Cardigan sweater knit in cashmere grey. This sweater knit has a small weave making it pretty stable and there is a soft and fuzzy feel on the right side.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use any way I like in exchange for sharing about it with you.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help fund for my sewing hobby.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

 

Foundation building with the Euler Bralette & Jalie 3242

Ok, so I had this great idea to make myself the Euler Bralette from Sophie Hines. A soft around the house bra was the goal and if it worked out well maybe, just maybe I could use the pattern to help make my first handmade swimsuit for this summer.

Gathering all the right materials from different sources was kind of a pain and I made some wrong purchases in the process. The smartest move I made was picking up a bra strapping kit from Simply By Ti when ordering my fabrics. The kit includes the strapping, rings, and sliders all sized to work together. I might recommend buying a bra kit for your first attempt so you have an idea what to look for in future bra supply shopping.

 

The construction of the Euler was pretty easy and I appreciated that I didn’t necessarily have to complete the bra in it’s entirety before knowing how it was going to fit. You can baste the side cups to the side elastic to make sure there’s no gaping. You can also baste the cups to the underband and the straps to the band at the back to check the positioning and strap length.

The Euler is constructed to hide all the seams and raw edges and gives instructions for adding trims and details. You’ll want to read through the instructions first, as the instructions to add trimmings come after the standard instuctions to complete a step.

I made the cobalt & black cotton lycra version first to match up with a pair of Jalie undies I made last year. I used the bra strapping from my Simply By Ti kit for the straps and along the sides of the cups.  The firmness is just right for the straps but a little too firm for the sides. For the underbust elastic I ended up using Dritz 1.5in soft waistband elastic. The softness is nice but it is not quite firm enough as there is a little bit of buckling at center front.

Where I struggled with the Euler was in the sizing. The size chart is based on bust measurement- no cup sizing like some bras- putting me in a size medium. The medium fits ok for my cup size, but I would like a little more coverage. The cutting chart for the elastics was very off for me. I had to cut my straps down 3in and still had extra length to work with. The underbust elastic needed to be shortened 3in at center back, and I used about 1in shorter elastic at the side cup than instructed. The lesson here is to measure it out on you before cutting so it fits your body’s unique shape or be prepared to waste a little on the first try.

In my second attempt (the grey & black) I used the medium size again but widened the neckline edge out to the xxlarge cutting line to give me a little more coverage. Good idea right? Well only sort of. When I did this I also ended up making the side edge longer and shifting the strap placement toward my center front and that makes it fit a little weird. Totally my mistake. I hope this pic illustrates the problems I created for myself.

In the grey version I used Dritz 1.5in ribbed nonroll elastic for the underbust and followed the pattern instructions to make a self fabric covering. This nonroll elastic is just right. It’s a good width and is just firm enough to support the bra and feel comfortable. I used a picot trim in the neckline seam and at the cup sides too.

Going forward I think what I need to do is reshape the neckline edge of the size medium to give me more coverage so I can keep the good strap placement and proper length at the side.

In the end I got what I was after, soft lounging bras and I do think this will work for a swim top if I can find the right type of swim elasics to use. (In the pic below I filled out the right side to give an idea of what it looks like on.)

 

The Pattern The Euler Bralette is from designer Sophie Hines. The Cobalt version is a size medium based on my bust measurement and altered as described above The grey is a med/xxlarge as described above. Underwear are Jalie 3242 womens bikini w/ my own colorblocking.

The Fabric   Cobalt, black, and grey cotton lycra jersey and bra strapping kit from Simply By Ti**   I made the cobalt/black pair of Jalie underwear about eight months ago out of Simply By Ti’s cotton/lycra, so I am confident the fabric is going to work well for these underwear sets and hold up well over time.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

**As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

You might also like: Jalie 3242 boys briefs

Save For Later Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

 

#SewInTheNewYear Virtual Sewing Party

Join us on Instagram for a virtual New Year’s Eve party!

We have hosts across various time zones. Be sure to follow everyone on Instagram now so you don’t miss any of the fun tonight! The party runs from 9pm to midnight in each time zone. We will have discussions and giveaways running throughout.

You can enter the giveaways on Instagram or via the rafflecopters below!

Use the hashtag #sewinthenewyear to join the conversation!

Meet your hosts!

Australian Hosts @TropicalJenks @VintageTina

UK Hosts @SewingDirectory @VickyMyersCreations

EST Hosts @SeamsLikeStyle @SequoiaLynnSews @G.MarieSews

CST Hosts @SeamsSewLo @SewingNovice

MST Hosts @CraftingThroughTime @MahlicaDesigns @PhatQuarters

PST Hosts @MadeByJaime @FroggiLady @HeatherSewist

 

Thank you to our MST Sponsors!

Other Sponsors include:

Amelia Lane Designs Blue Dot Patterns Bubble Baby Custom Fabrics Cotton Cuts DG Patterns Dinkydoo Fabrics and Notions Dressew Duchess and Hare PDF Patterns Ellie and Mac 5OutOf4 Patterns George and Ginger Glam Sprouts Fabric Green Style Creations Hearthrob Threads Helen’s Closet Made By Jaime Peek a Boo Pattern Shop Phat Quarters Pretty Posh Prints Quiet Book Queen Rain City Pattern Co Ragamuffin Patterns Rebecca Page Seams Like Style Seen and Sewn Patterns Sew Blessed SimplyByTi Stitchin Pretties So Sew English Suco By Susana Surge Fabric Shop The Fab Clique The Fabric Fairy The Fabric Market The Handmaiden’s Cottage Twig and Tale Winter Wear Designs …and more!

Click here to enter the #SewInTheNewYear Bundle 1 Giveaway!! Starts 9pm MST

Click here to enter the #SewInTheNewYear Bundle 2 Giveaway!! Starts 10pm MST

Click here to enter the #SewInTheNewYear Bundle 3 Giveaway!! Starts 11pm MST

Come and join in the fun! See you there!

Tessa Sweater Dress- featuring DG Patterns Ribbed Knit

The Tessa Sweater Dress I made to share this week helps me get close to having all the winter wardrobe pieces I need this year. I really like wearing dresses, but it can be hard to feel warm enough in the cold months, so I’m hoping a nice sweater dress will do the trick.

When Daniela listed this ribbed sweater knit in her shop, I knew I wanted to try sewing with it and hoped it would work for a sweater dress. I’d not sewn a dress with sweater knit before, so I was a little concerned that the length of the piece would cause the fabric to stretch and lengthen when worn. In this case I believe the structure that the ribbing offers and the smaller weave keep things in nice shape.

My plan was to sew up the Tessa Dress last minute to wear for Thanksgiving. I’d look nice, be comfortable all day, and have room for an expanding belly. I came down sick just before the big day and only just got the meal prep I was responsible for complete with the help of my husband- thanks my dear.

Sewing was not happening when I just wanted to crawl into bed, so the Tessa and I missed Thanksgiving. No worries though, I got to wear her to my office Christmas party last week and had a wonderful time.

The Pattern: I used the Tessa Sweater & Dress Pattern from DG Patterns in a size 10 based on my measurements. Through the hips I graded down to an 8 for a closer fit. Depending on the stretch of the fabric, I could easily sew up a straight size 8 next time.

The Fabric: Striped ribbed sweater knit (similar) from the DG Patterns shop.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

You might also like the Lazo Trousers I made in the DG Patterns’ Organic Tencel.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

Lazo Trousers from Thread Theory- featuring DG Patterns Organic Tencel

It took me about a month to get it done, but I sewed up my first pair of Lazo Trousers from Thread Theory. The pattern isn’t hard at all, November was just slow going on the sewing front.

I originally picked up the Lazo pattern hoping to use them to knock off this look I found on pinterest, but my interest in that project has waned.

Picking up a big bag full of discounted closures at Hobby Lobby did bring the Lazos back into focus though. I really like the look they have with two buckles at the waistline and now I can totally do that.

The Pattern: Lazo Trousers in size 10 and shortened 2in. After my muslin, I pinched out a 1/2in wedge from the center back yoke.

Pattern feedback- 1. you should stay-stitch the upper edge of the pants after making your pleats, not after you’ve constructed the whole pant and inserted the fly. I didn’t have a problem with my fabric stretching, but play it safe and do this step early on.  2. I’m not a fan of attaching the zipper to the fly shield as it doesn’t look as neat on the inside. I really like the fly insertion instructions from the Liana Jeans and often use them when making other pants. 3. I inserted the belt tabs into the waistband seam for extra security and a neater finish.

The Fabric: Organic Tencel in navy from DG Patterns shop. If you haven’t sewn with tencel yet I really encourage you to pick some up and give it a whirl. Tencel has nice drape and is super soft to the touch. The silk setting on my iron seamed to work best in combination with a pressing cloth. Direct pressing tended to leave a mark and slight sheen on multiple layers. Tencel woven is one of the recommended fabrics for the Lazos and would work well with any pant, skirt, or dress that needs a nice drape.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

You might also like The modern striped boatneck top I’m wearing.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

Onyx Shirt in Elephant Print Crepe

I’m slowly getting back into the swing of sewing again with the Onyx Shirt made with the Elephant print crepe woven from the DG Patterns Shop*

I’ve made the Onyx shirt twice before, so I know the fit is just right without any alterations, but this was my first time using the longer sleeve add on for the pattern. I chose the 3/4 sleeve length for a less formal look and because there is a cuff option.

I’m very pleased with my crepe version of the Onyx shirt. I will be watching how well the folded cuff keeps it’s shape in the crepe. Since the crepe does not hold a crisp press, I may need to tack the cuff in place on the outer edge.

The Pattern The Onyx Shirt (with sleeve expansion pack) from Paprika Patterns in a straight size 4. Since I was using a crepe woven for the top,  I used French Seams throughout to keep those seam allowances nice and neat and prevent any fraying down the road.

The Fabric The Elephant print polyester crepe from DG Patterns. This seems like a light/medium weight woven to me. It’s a good weight woven for summer or fall wardrobe pieces. I used a universal size 9 needle and the lowest heat setting on my iron to work with the fabric.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

*The post may contain affiliate links. As an affiliate, I receive a sales comission to help with my sewing hobby.