Dreamtime Jammies

It’s that time of year where Christmas sewing takes over and the to do lists pile high. I’m not into stressing myself out in that way, so I keep my Christmas sewing easy with just one obligation; Christmas Eve pajamas for my little guy.

Dreamtime Jammies

Flannel pjs using the Pajama Rama pattern from ShwinandShwin have been my standard, but I’ve mixed things up a bit by sewing a new pattern; the Dreamtime Jammies from Blank Slate Patterns.

Dreamtime Jammies

Are you sewing any pajamas this holiday? If you are, you can join the Pajama Linkup Party hosted by Pearberry Lane. (Ends 12/14/16)

The Fabric: Superhero Pups Interlock from Joann.com. I like that this knit is a little thicker for winter and has enough stretch to easily use for the cuffs and neckband on the pattern.

Dreamtime Jammies

The Pattern: I downloaded the free size 4 last year from Melly Sews. A full pattern in all sizes was released this fall on her Blank Slate Patterns store. I can’t really give a pattern review here since I didn’t look at the instructions. I’ve sewn enough tees and knit pants that I can just do it. I will say the fit is spot on for a size 4. (Too bad my 4 1/2 year old hit a growth spurt)

Dreamtime Jammies

Dreamtime Jammies

The Dreamtime Jammies should take you about 2 hours to make. I used about 1 yard at 60in wide.

Total Cost: $7      Pattern $0   Fabric $6      Notions $1

 

Little boy photoshoot outtakes

Giggle Monster:

Dreamtime Jammies

Yeti impersonation:

Dreamtime Jammies

“I keep falling down”

Dreamtime Jammies

Georgia On My Mind. I hacked the Georgia Top again

I made my first Georgia Top for the Creative Sewing Challenge back in November and when putting together a post to inspire creativity with the Georgia pattern, I just had to put another version on my “to sew” list.

Georgia Hack by mahlicadesigns

I used the Georgia Top from Blue Dot Patterns in a size small again and modified the pattern by adding length to the sleeves and making a new cutting line for the lace piecing (tutorial below).

Georgia Hack by mahlicadesigns

I used a stable jersey knit from my stash paired with a lace purchased from Fabric Mart. I’ve not sewn with lace before, but since the lace I chose is not as fine and sheer as some lace can be, I just treated it like a knit and constructed the whole project with my serger. No problems.

Georgia Hack by mahlicadesigns

I’m just as pleased with my second Georgia, but have to laugh at myself for making two versions that have built in ventilation.

Georgia Hack by mahlicadesigns

Get my look (tutorial):

Let’s draw a new pattern line on the front pattern piece. I marked my outside shoulder at 4.25in from the neckline. I made a bust mark 4in down from CF neckline and 5in over (next time I’d make it 6in over to cover more of my chest). I marked the side 4in up from the bottom. I used a French curve to draw my new cutting line; keeping the line through most of the body vertical with a slight curve up to the shoulder and a dramatic curve at the waistline.

**I had the benefit of having a Georgia already made that I could use to determine the placement of my markings.

New Drawing lines

Cut along your new pattern line. Take a moment to label your new piece. Use your new front piece to trace your line onto the unmodified back piece. Cut your new pattern line on the back and label.

New drawing line traced

New Pieces Cut

I added 7.5in to the sleeve to make it long sleeve on me ( I’dd add more next time). I recommend you do some measuring to figure what will work for you.

Tips:

  • Label your new pattern pieces.
  • Add seam allowance to your new cut lines: I marked the cutting line on my fabric with chalk; you can trace off new pattern pieces if you want.
  • Make sure you’re ok with the amount of exposure the lace will give. I plan on wearing a cami.

A modified Georgia top should take you 2 hours to complete. Add about 20 minutes to draw new pattern lines.

Fabric $3  Pattern $0*  Total Cost $3

I received the Georgia Top Pattern free as a gift for hosting the Creative Sewing Challenge

Matilda VS. Sloan leggings: Pattern Showdown Series

Welcome back to VS.

A series here at mahlicadesigns with the aim of pairing similar styles against each other in a friendly showdown to see which pattern better suits me, all while working through my pattern stash. (Overview here)

Today we’re switching gears over to leggings.

 

 Sloan leggings from Hey June Handmade

Sloan VS. Matilda 3 square collage

Matilda leggings from Spit Up & Stilettos (download)**

Sloan VS Matilda 1

The Sloan leggings (view B) are a contoured legging with a shaped waistband. Sizing options are included for petite, regular, and tall in addition to the regular, capri and 3/4 length style lines. I used ponte knits with just a little stretch, so I chose my size based on my hip measurement.  The pieced waistband gave me the opportunity to colorblock my front waistband to use up some smaller scraps. I have a few fitting adjustments I’d make to remove a little poofiness from the front rise and a little bit of sag below my bottom. I’m pretty sure that using the suggested stretchy fabrics with recommended smaller size may eliminate these adjustments.

Sloan VS. Matilda 3

The Matilda Leggings are a basic silhouette with rectangular waistband. The rise on these is really short, so I added 1in front and back and would add another 1/2in to the back next time. Only two pattern pieces makes it quick to cut out and quick to sew; but only one piece for the body makes it more challenging to adjust the fit. I probably need to do a full bottom adjustment, but will only be able to adjust the rise to accommodate.  The pattern also seems to be proportioned for a uncurvy shape. I used a standard jersey knit. (See a more thorough review here).

Sloan V Matilda 2

Now let’s compare

Instructions.

Sloan: Thorough and easy to understand instructions with good diagrams. Good tips on picking your correct size and fabrics. I appreciated the tip on adding elastic to the waistband.

Matilda: Straight forward and easy instructions with pictures. The sample in the pictures are in black fabric. Not very helpful, but even a novice sewer can do these with out the pictures.

 

Fit.

Sloan: Size Large based on hip measurement and fabric with little stretch. Other than the fitting adjustments mentioned above, the fit is comfortable and nicely shaped. I may make the waist band shorter next time. It just seams a little out of proportion on me.

Matilda: Size medium. I found them to run a tad small at the hip and not as fitted from the knee down. The rectangular waistband feels a little loose. I would recommend fabrics with 25-50% stretch and good recovery.

Style.

Sloan: Good seam lines, nice shaping, multiple lengths, and color mixing options. A modern look ideal for casual dressing or athletic wear.

Matilda: Good basic legging.

Investment.

Sloan: 1.75 hours to make, fabric $6, pattern $6.95*, about 1.5yd @ 60in wide

Matilda:  1 hour to make, fabric $8, pattern free, about 1yd @ 60in wide

Opportunities.

Sloan: Color blocking galore, but I really wouldn’t want to mess around with the pattern’s design lines

Matilda: Significant time investment to adjust fit and pattern hack.

.

For me, the Sloan is the winner. They just feel comfortable everywhere, the pattern is well designed and you can do so much with it.

Sloan 7

*$6.95 was my price through Up Craft Club for the Sloan leggings.

**Spit Up and Stilettos has rebranded to Sadi & Sam; a kids pattern company. Sadly for us, all their free womans patterns have disappeared from the internet. Sadi & Sam have given me permission to share the Matilda pattern with you. Download Here.

Twisted Tuck Wristlet tutorial by mahlicadesigns

Feature collage

For the September Sew With Me challenge on facebook, I needed to make an accessory. After being stumped a while, I came up with an idea for an accessory that I actually needed; a small purse with a handle. I drafted my own pattern, so I wanted to do a practice run before working with a faux leather for my final version. The first version out of quilting cottons was made up for my So Sew Easy Sewing Swap partner. I hope she likes it.

Since I put in some effort to draft my pattern and work out the twisted tucks detail, I wanted to share a tutorial so you can make one too.

You’ll need:

Twisted Tuck Wristlet template, 4.5in X 14in rectangle for twisted tuck detail, 3in X 11in piece for strap, 11in X 8in for interior pocket (optional), fusible fleece or heavy weight fusible stabilizer, 9in zipper.

Cut Exterior Fabric: 1 main body, 2 front side pieces, 1 tuck piece, 1 strap piece

Cut Interior Fabric: 2 main body, 1 pocket.

Cut fusible fleece: 2 main body (hint: trim away about 1/2in from edges to reduce bulk in your seams, especially at the top edge)

First we’ll make the twisted tucks insert.

  1. Grab your 4.5 x 14 inch piece. Mark one of the shorter ends on the wrong side as the Top. Make your first fold, wrong sides together, 2in down from the Top edge. Press. Sew 3/4in away from and parallel to your folded edge.**
  2. Make your next fold, wrong sides together,  1 5/8in down from the stitching line you made in step #1. Press and sew 3/4in from your folded edge. Repeat until you have a total of five tucks.
  3. Press tucks down. Baste tucks down on one edge using 3/8in seam allowance. Fold and pin tucks up on other side. The edges will not line up squarely, that’s ok, its more important to keep the piece squared up. Baste in place using a 3/8in seam allowance. You should have 1/2in of fabric above your top tuck and more below your bottom tuck.Tucks collage
  4. Using a 1/2in seam allowance, attach the side pieces to the tucks insert, lining the pieces up at the top. Press. The insert should be a little longer than the side pieces, trim away any excess after the side pieces are attached.

front

Next, we finish getting our pieces ready.

5. Trim 1/2in away from the top, flat edge of the fleece if you haven’t done that already. Apply the fusible fleece to the wrong sides of the two exterior pieces.

6. Press the pocket piece in half lengthwise, wrong sides together. Center the pocket on top of one of the lining pieces, right sides up. The lower raw edge of the pocket should line up with the lower edge of the lining piece. Bits of the pocket will hang over. To make a 3in card slot, I mark the center of the pocket, then measure and mark 1.5in out each side of center. Stitch along the marked lines, backstitching at the top to reinforce. You can divide the remaining pocket area as desired or leave them alone.  Tip:  1.75in to 2in width is good for a lipstick slot. Trim off any overhanging parts of the pocket.Pocket7. Press the strap in half lengthwise wrong sides facing. Open up, fold long edges in to meet at the center, press, and fold again. Same as if you’re making a double fold binding. Stitch 1/8in from the folded edges to close the strap. Place one of the exterior pieces right side up. Position the strap 1in down from top edge and with raw edges facing out. Baste in place.

backAssembly:

8. Mark a line 1/8in down from top edge on right side of a Lining piece.** Position the zipper right side up along this line, making sure the top zipper stop is about 3/8in in from the side. Pin in place. Position one of the Exterior pieces on top, right side down. The zipper is sandwiched between the layers. Using a zipper foot, stitch 1/2in from edge. Repeat with the second lining and exterior pieces.

Wristlet zipper insertion collage

9. Open out the layers so zipper is in the center. Press and topstich about 1/8in away from exposed zipper tape.

Top stitching collage

10. With needle & thread, make a new zipper stop about 3/8in from edge. Trim away excess length of the zipper. Open zipper by about 3/4s.zipper end collage

11. Fold one exterior piece over onto the other exterior piece, right sides together. Line up exterior and lining pieces, making sure open edges of zipper are lined up. Pin as needed.

12. Leave a 3in opening at the bottom edge of the lining pieces. About 1.5in from center bottom of lining, start stitching with a 5/8in seam allowance, as you sew around the curve gradually change your seam allowance to 1/2in. before you reach the zipper. Sew slowly as you go over the zipper. As you come back around to the lining, increase your seam allowance to 5/8in after the curve.stitching

13. Carefully trim excess bulk from the zipper corners. Clip the curves and trim seam allowance around the bottom edge of the lining by about half.

14. Pull the wristlet right side out through the opening in the lining. Hand stitch the lining closed. Use a turning tool to push out the corners at the top and smooth out the lining and curves.

lining opening

Zip it up and your done!

Final collage 3

** This sentence edited after publishing to be more clear.

Tonic 2 Tee pattern hack by mahlicadesigns

As part of the Sew With Me challenge in September to make four coordinates, I used some of the remaining fabric from my Matilda leggings, to make a color blocked version of the Tonic 2 Tee from SBCC patterns. (Previous Tonic 2’s here & here & here )

Tonic 2 Tee hack by mahlicadesigns

I made a size small with a few adjustments to the pattern this time. I raised the neckline  by 1in at center front, narrowed the neckline by 1/2in at the shoulders and drew a new neckline curve. I also shortened the sleeves to about 17in finished length to make a 3/4 sleeve.

Tonic 2 Tee hack by mahlicadesigns

For the color blocked portion, I used one of my previous versions to determine where I’d like the new sewing line to be, retraced pattern pieces and added seam allowances. I also noted where my center bust point was so I could slightly curve the color block line down from center bust to about 1/2in lower at the sides.

Tonic 2 Tee hack by mahlicadesigns

It didn’t quite come out as hoped. Next time I’ll move the sewing line up a little more above my bust and redraw the curve to be more noticeable. I also learned to consider stretch more carefully. The stretch in the top fabric is much less than previous fabrics used and pulls across the top of my shoulders.

Tonic 2 Tee hack by mahlicadesigns

The Tonic 2 Tee should take you about 2.25 hours cut to finish, plus time to redraft your pattern.

Fabric $5  Pattern $0   Total $5

I also entered my Tonic 2 into the Sewing Indie Month contest.

Burda’s Asymmetric tee for Core Wardrobe building

This shirt really was rollercoaster experience for me. At first site I was pretty crazy about this top. I mean come on; black and white, stripes, asymmetry, mod styling. In true fashion I had to think about it, wait for the pattern to go on sale, and find the perfect fabric. Still very excited about it.

Burda 01/2014 122

Then, fabric ready and pattern printed, hesitation set in like no tomorrow. I was concerned this would be too long and the funky shaped pattern pieces did not lend themselves to getting a good measure of the finished product. I’m on the shorter side (5’4″) and really did not want a too long top, which could easily happen with this design. I also wanted this top to be more fitted so the gathers weren’t too droopy.

Burda Asymetric tee

In true Burda fashion, pattern details like finished measurements and instructions are of little help or non-existent, so I would have to make guesses at getting a good fit. After a few days of hemming and hawing, I just dove in. Still unsure. Hoping I wasn’t wasting this great fabric.

Burda asymmetric tee

Let me include that I downloaded the pattern, so I did not have the advantage of the better sewing instructions that are included in the January 2014 magazine.

I  used my size, a 40,  but did not add a seam allowance (they are not included in the pattern) I serged with a 3/8in seam allowance. Success number one, it’s fitted but not tight.  I shortened the pattern by removing 2.5in from the bodice hem line and 3in from the sleeve length. Success number two is a length that is working for me. I tried to stripe match between the sleeve and bodice but used a point that ended up under the arm. I should have lined up the stripes at the top of the sleeve. Stripe matching was a bust but not really a big deal.

Burda Asymmetric tee

A few more details:  I gathered the sides with a basting stitch, basted clear elastic tape on top of the gathers, then serged the side seams. I serged the sleeve seams then inserted them into the bodice. One sleeve connects with a gathered part of the bodice. I pinned the sleeve in, then gathered that part of the bodice to fit before serging in that sleeve.

Burda Asymmetric tee

I did a neckline insertion by sewing in an 18in neckband loop into the 21in opening. I hemmed the sleeves and bodice by folding up 1in secured with a stretch stitch.

Burda Asymmetric tee by mahlicadesigns

I used a cotton/spandex jersey knit in Midnight Navy/Heathered Gray Stripe (no longer available) from Fabric Mart.

Burda 01/2014 #122  should take you less than 2 hours.

Fabric $13*   Pattern $5    Total Cost: $18

*I include shipping in my calculations

Lindy Petal Skirt from Itch To Stitch; Core Wardrobe Building

Lindy Skirt by mahlicadesigns

A lot of times I hem and haw when deciding on a pattern and then spend even more time on fabric. As you may know, I’m slowly working on building my Core Wardrobe. One of the items on my list is a summer weight skirt in charcoal gray. I associate charcoal gray with the winter season, so it’s been a challenge to find a pattern and fabric inspiration for this piece.

Lindy Petal Skirt
Lindy Petal Skirt

The Lindy Petal Skirt pattern was released a couple weeks ago and gave me that ah-ha moment I needed. The Lindy is a knit skirt, which I hadn’t thought of doing, and I had just enough of this rayon terry left over from one of my Jaspers to use. The length, silhouette, and wrap look of the petals all said spring/summer to me.

100_4045

If you’re looking for a quick and easy sew that ends with a great look the Lindy has what you need. The pattern is free from Itch To Stitch and it looks like she takes care to make quality patterns.

I used a medium weight terry knit, I think using a lighter weight knit like a jersey with a little stretch would be ideal so you don’t get some of the lumpiness at the side seams like mine. Shortening by 1in was my only pattern alteration. I’m 5’4.

So what do you think? Did I get a spring/summer success? I feel pretty good about it.

Oh, and yeah I got a hair cut between photos.

The Lindy Petal Skirt should take you about 1.5  hours.

Fabric $8  Total Cost: $8  Yea, more stash busting.