Viewridge top- pattern review

This spring I’m finally getting around to starting in on those woven tanks I’ve been meaning to make for the last three summers. It feels like I have oodles of patterns in the stash to try, but I’m starting with the Viewridge Top from Straight Stitch Designs that I won in last year’s Indie Pattern month on The Monthly Stitch.

 

I like loose fitting tops for summer, but gathers and pleats seem to add too much volume at the bust for my taste. The Viewridge does have small gathers at the front, but I think they are nicely balanced by structured side and yoke pieces.

Viewridge view B includes small gathers at center front. Photo from Straight Stitch Designs

The Viewridge should be pretty easy for an advanced beginner sewist due to the use of bias tape to finish the neckline and arm hole and making even gathers. Even so, I managed to make it difficult on myself. I didn’t press my fabric when I pulled it back out of my stash. Slightly wrinkled shifty and slippery rayon wovens are not fun to cut and I ended up with one piece slightly off grain. I definitely had some hair pulling as I tried to figure out why one piece ended up slightly lopsided (because it was off grain and wrinkly) and how to fix it.

As I was working through that, Rachel of Oakblue Designs was sharing her success in cutting the same type of fabric after treating it with a spray stabilizer. Noted.

I also found a small error on the pattern at the shoulder. The pattern marking doesn’t line up. Use them to help you know which pieces go together, but you’ll be fine lining up these pieces without them.

 

The Pattern: Viewridge Top from Straight Stitch Designs, view B in size 10 and shortened 2in at the adjustment line. I chose a size 10 based on my 37.5in bust measurement. The pattern instructions suggest that for larger cups sizes to try one size larger for the front pattern pieces than you use for the back pieces. I stuck with a straight 10 and feel like it fits well.  Overall I give the pattern an A, the instructions are well put together and the pattern is well drafted. That one misaligned pattern marking is easily overcome.

The Fabric: I picked up this floral rayon a year or so ago at Joann Fabrics. It’s beautiful and unfortunately it was only available for a moment.

 

As always, thanks for reading today.

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This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

You might like: My Ella Cami Set made in the same fabric.

 

Save For Later  Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

Phinney Ridge Cardigan- featuring DG Patterns Cardigan Knit

I picked the Phinney Ridge Cardigan and the Magnuson Vest from Straight Stitch Designs as my prize in The Monthly Stitch‘s Indie Pattern Month contest. Of course I really wanted to sew up both right away, but the cardigan gets first try in this cozy cardigan sweater knit that I got from DG Patterns fabric shop.

I really like the V neck line and the deep cuffs of the Phinney Ridge. The cardigan looks really cute with buttons down the front, but I never button my cardigans and I’m afraid to do button holes on knits, so I go without.

To make my Phinney a little more interesting I used a faux leather for the cuffs and I just love it.

The Pattern: Phinney Ridge Cardigan from Straight Stitch Designs in size medium per her sizing chart and graded to size 12 at the hips. This one is an easy sew and well put together. The instructions have you sew each side of the neckband separately starting from the bottom and moving toward the center back of the neck. This thoughtful step keeps the neckline looking very nice. I basted each side and then finished the seam with my overlocker.

The Fabric:  Cardigan sweater knit in cashmere grey. This sweater knit has a small weave making it pretty stable and there is a soft and fuzzy feel on the right side.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use any way I like in exchange for sharing about it with you.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help fund for my sewing hobby.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

 

Greenwood Tank – Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best, a series on mahlicadesigns.

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my blogger friends joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

Elizabeth from Elizabeth Made This has joined me in making up the Greenwood Tank from Straight Stitch Designs for the challenge and you can check out her version here.

Almost everyone needs summer tanks and they are a wardrobe workhorse for me in my non air-conditioned house, but to be honest I struggled a little with how to make a straight forward design seem interesting enough for the Who Made It Best challenge. My challenger, Elizabeth, is a whiz at pattern hacking and surface design, so I felt pretty intimidated trying to go one of these routes and they really didn’t feel “me” for this project.

I put together a Greenwood Inspiration pinterest board with all kinds of ideas I want to try, but I settled on accenting the geometric print of my fabric with a triangular insert at the center back neckline. This does feel “me”.

For the body of my Greenwood, I used the Circuit Ashen knit from Art Gallery fabrics and a stretchy metallic looking mystery fabric for the triangle insert.

I was super careful getting the placement correct for the triangle insert; measuring and double checking and I still got that sucker kinda crooked. Gah!

So, who do you think made the Greenwood Tank best? Please visit Elizabeth Made This for more pictures and details on her version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both blogs, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

You can also take a look at the Bronte Tee, Shoreline Boatneck, and Sorbetto Top that were part of past Who Made It Best challenges.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.