Parker Peplum Dress Hack

I’m back today with a simple hack I’ve done with the Parker Peplum Top pattern turning it into a dress and using the organic bamboo jersey from DG Patterns Shop*

Turning the Parker into a dress is quite simple. All you need is a circle skirt pattern or draft your own. There are tons of tutorials online to walk you through it.

I cut my circle skirt 19.5 in long and simply attached it to the bottom of the completed bodice. Viola, Parker Peplum Top is now a dress!

 

The Pattern: Parker Peplum top from Seen & Sewn Patterns in size medium. I added a circle skirt to make mine a dress. The Parker is a loose-fitting peplum with an option for a regular tee.

The Fabric: Organic bamboo jersey in black and white stripes. This was my first experience sewing with organic bamboo jersey. It’s quite similar to rayon jersey in its weight and drape, but this has a silkier smooth feel to it.

 

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use any way I like in exchange for sharing about it with you.

This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help fund for my sewing hobby.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

 

Foundation building with the Euler Bralette & Jalie 3242

Ok, so I had this great idea to make myself the Euler Bralette from Sophie Hines. A soft around the house bra was the goal and if it worked out well maybe, just maybe I could use the pattern to help make my first handmade swimsuit for this summer.

Gathering all the right materials from different sources was kind of a pain and I made some wrong purchases in the process. The smartest move I made was picking up a bra strapping kit from Simply By Ti when ordering my fabrics. The kit includes the strapping, rings, and sliders all sized to work together. I might recommend buying a bra kit for your first attempt so you have an idea what to look for in future bra supply shopping.

 

The construction of the Euler was pretty easy and I appreciated that I didn’t necessarily have to complete the bra in it’s entirety before knowing how it was going to fit. You can baste the side cups to the side elastic to make sure there’s no gaping. You can also baste the cups to the underband and the straps to the band at the back to check the positioning and strap length.

The Euler is constructed to hide all the seams and raw edges and gives instructions for adding trims and details. You’ll want to read through the instructions first, as the instructions to add trimmings come after the standard instuctions to complete a step.

I made the cobalt & black cotton lycra version first to match up with a pair of Jalie undies I made last year. I used the bra strapping from my Simply By Ti kit for the straps and along the sides of the cups.  The firmness is just right for the straps but a little too firm for the sides. For the underbust elastic I ended up using Dritz 1.5in soft waistband elastic. The softness is nice but it is not quite firm enough as there is a little bit of buckling at center front.

Where I struggled with the Euler was in the sizing. The size chart is based on bust measurement- no cup sizing like some bras- putting me in a size medium. The medium fits ok for my cup size, but I would like a little more coverage. The cutting chart for the elastics was very off for me. I had to cut my straps down 3in and still had extra length to work with. The underbust elastic needed to be shortened 3in at center back, and I used about 1in shorter elastic at the side cup than instructed. The lesson here is to measure it out on you before cutting so it fits your body’s unique shape or be prepared to waste a little on the first try.

In my second attempt (the grey & black) I used the medium size again but widened the neckline edge out to the xxlarge cutting line to give me a little more coverage. Good idea right? Well only sort of. When I did this I also ended up making the side edge longer and shifting the strap placement toward my center front and that makes it fit a little weird. Totally my mistake. I hope this pic illustrates the problems I created for myself.

In the grey version I used Dritz 1.5in ribbed nonroll elastic for the underbust and followed the pattern instructions to make a self fabric covering. This nonroll elastic is just right. It’s a good width and is just firm enough to support the bra and feel comfortable. I used a picot trim in the neckline seam and at the cup sides too.

Going forward I think what I need to do is reshape the neckline edge of the size medium to give me more coverage so I can keep the good strap placement and proper length at the side.

In the end I got what I was after, soft lounging bras and I do think this will work for a swim top if I can find the right type of swim elasics to use. (In the pic below I filled out the right side to give an idea of what it looks like on.)

 

The Pattern The Euler Bralette is from designer Sophie Hines. The Cobalt version is a size medium based on my bust measurement and altered as described above The grey is a med/xxlarge as described above. Underwear are Jalie 3242 womens bikini w/ my own colorblocking.

The Fabric   Cobalt, black, and grey cotton lycra jersey and bra strapping kit from Simply By Ti**   I made the cobalt/black pair of Jalie underwear about eight months ago out of Simply By Ti’s cotton/lycra, so I am confident the fabric is going to work well for these underwear sets and hold up well over time.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

**As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

You might also like: Jalie 3242 boys briefs

Save For Later Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

 

Tessa Sweater Dress- featuring DG Patterns Ribbed Knit

The Tessa Sweater Dress I made to share this week helps me get close to having all the winter wardrobe pieces I need this year. I really like wearing dresses, but it can be hard to feel warm enough in the cold months, so I’m hoping a nice sweater dress will do the trick.

When Daniela listed this ribbed sweater knit in her shop, I knew I wanted to try sewing with it and hoped it would work for a sweater dress. I’d not sewn a dress with sweater knit before, so I was a little concerned that the length of the piece would cause the fabric to stretch and lengthen when worn. In this case I believe the structure that the ribbing offers and the smaller weave keep things in nice shape.

My plan was to sew up the Tessa Dress last minute to wear for Thanksgiving. I’d look nice, be comfortable all day, and have room for an expanding belly. I came down sick just before the big day and only just got the meal prep I was responsible for complete with the help of my husband- thanks my dear.

Sewing was not happening when I just wanted to crawl into bed, so the Tessa and I missed Thanksgiving. No worries though, I got to wear her to my office Christmas party last week and had a wonderful time.

The Pattern: I used the Tessa Sweater & Dress Pattern from DG Patterns in a size 10 based on my measurements. Through the hips I graded down to an 8 for a closer fit. Depending on the stretch of the fabric, I could easily sew up a straight size 8 next time.

The Fabric: Striped ribbed sweater knit (similar) from the DG Patterns shop.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

You might also like the Lazo Trousers I made in the DG Patterns’ Organic Tencel.

Save For Later: Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

*As a DG Patterns Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the DG Patterns fabric shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

Bonn Shirt – featuring Simply By Ti Stretch Poplin

Here we are with my Itch to Stitch Bonn Shirt made with Simply By Ti’s Stretch Poplin**

I don’t think I’ve sewn a blouse that was easier to make. After muslining the bodice I shortened things up to fit me and it was smooth sailing from there.

The Bonn pattern instructions are super easy to follow, making the construction no big deal.

The only trouble I had with the project was with my button-holer. I’ve used it loads of times, but for this I managed to botch it up over and over again. I think I ripped out the same button-hole on the cuff five times.

The Pattern The Bonn Shirt from Itch to Stitch made in a straight size 6. I shortened the bodice 1/4in at the upper adjustment line and 1/2in at the lower adjustment line. The sleeves are shortened by 1/4in. I did not need to grade out to a larger size for my hips like usual. Next time I may shorten it a little more in the bodice as it is still quite long.

The Fabric Teal stretch poplin from Simply By Ti**  The stretch feels wonderful in the more fitted areas of the Bonn and I’d use this weight of woven for any cool weather season. I had to do a lot of seam ripping and handling of the fabric. With all the back and forth I had to do with this project, the fabric still looked wonderful, had hardly a fray at the edges, and withstood all my unstitching.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

**As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

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Sail Away Tank featuring Simply By Ti Fabrics

I’m coming at you today with my Sail Away tank hack made with Simply By Ti fabric** My intention was to show my Sail Away outfit together, but I goofed and didn’t get pictures of the tank and Landers together.

See all of my Sail Away outfit inspiration here.

The Pattern The free Durango Tank modified as described below. Size 10. Also shown are the Lander shorts from True Bias.

The Fabrics Navy with ivory stripes rayon for the tank and khaki stretch twill for the shorts. Both from Simply By Ti** Rayon jersey is great for its drape and that’s what I really wanted for the tank to lay well over my hips. The stretch twill is the perfect fabric for shorts. The stretch is great for making a trim fitting pair of Landers, doesn’t bag out, and the weight is just right for bottoms.

The Hack

Durango Tank in size 10. I shortened the tank by 1in at the waist line and did a 1/2in sway back adjustment to fit my particular shape. I also dropped the neckline by 1 in at CF and CB. Next, I traced the full front bodice to draw my contrast piece.

To make my S-curve contrast piece, I measured 9 3/4in up from the CF hem line to mark my natural waistline at the CF and at the left (as worn) side seam. On the right (as worn) side seam I marked 4 1/2in up from the CF hem line. I used my french curve to draw a convex curving line from the left side flattening out at the CF, then curving in a concave curve from CF to the right side.

Grab another piece of tracing paper and trace the bottom of your bodice piece marking the S curved line very clearly. Mark a notch at the CF of the curved line. Make sure you have space above the curve on your new tracing to add a seam allowance. Add your seam allowance to the top of your piece and transfer the CF notch to the new cut line. I use a compass to add seam allowances to curved lines. Be sure to draw your grain line marking and the perpendicular bias line marking if you are going to switch up your stripes like I did. Trim away excess paper from your new pattern piece

Go back to your main bodice piece and add the same seam allowance below the original curve line you drew and mark the CF notch. Trim away the excess paper below the new curve line you’ve drawn.

Now cut out your fabric. Attach the lower portion of the bodice to the top bodice piece before continuing with the pattern instructions as normal.

Make yours even better by making your curve more S-shaped than mine.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

**As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

You might also like Sail Away Lander shorts.

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Change up the Tee blog tour + GiveAway

What makes a tee, the perfect tee? Well, when it comes to sewing for my little guy, perfection comes when I don’t have to think about it too much. That’s what I found in the Primary Tee from GYCT. I just cut it out, sewed it up and bam! Perfect fit.

The Primary Tee comes with short sleeve and long sleeve options (plus a dress version), so I’m feeling pretty good about sewing tees for my guy all season long with this pattern.

To Change Up the Tee for the blog tour I planned a fun ice dyeing project for my little guy and I to do together. Perhaps you’ve seen the beautiful ice dye projects on pinterest too. I tricked myself into thinking this would be super easy, but found myself in a pickle when I didn’t really read the directions too closely ahead of time.

I made up the little guy’s Primary Tee using white cotton/lycra from the Simply By Ti shop and sorta followed this video tutorial using Rit dyes. We were golden up to part where you have to rinse and set the project. The sorta part was I didn’t purchase the fixative (again I didn’t really prepare well by looking at the directions beforehand) and I didn’t rinse for 20 minutes in hot water- more like 5 minutes.

What I did was a short rinse in hot water with Retayne (the only fixative I have on hand), then refreshed my water bucket with hose water several times until it was running a little clearer. I did one last bucket full of water and fixative for a few minutes before bringing the project inside. At this point the tee looked great. The colors were vibrant purple, fuchsia, and yellow with portions of the white cotton/lycra coming through.

Next, I put the tee in the washer, washed on hot with more Retayne, dried on hot, and washed again in warm water with regular detergent. The final result is much more muted.

 

The little guy loves the tee and is proud of what we made together. I would have liked to colors to remain as saturated as they looked before going through the wash. I think another try at this is needed.

If you’d like to try Changing Up the Primary Tee, you can save $2 using code “SEWBLUE” off of the Primary Tee pattern, good from July 2-July 15, 2018

Thank you Made for Little Gents for hosting the tour and Thank you GYCT Designs for providing the Primary Tee as our canvas for creativity.

Kicking Off The Changing Up The Tee Blog Tour

Thanks for reading! Check out what other bloggers are doing and come up with ideas for changing up the tee by following along with the blog tour below:

Fri. June 29
Made for Little Gents (Intro to Tour)
Mon. July 2
Family of Makers
Tues. July 3
Made for Little Gents
Wed. July 4
Frullemieke
Thurs. July 5
Made by Laura!
Fri. July 6
Auschick Sews
Mon. July 9
Kate Will Knit | Sew Cute Couture by Kathy
Tues. July 10
Tenille’s Thread | Mahlica Designs
Wed. July 11
Momma Newey’s Makes | Our Play Place
Thurs. July 12
My Sewing Roots | Elli and Nels
Fri. July 13
Dreams and Stitches | Stylin’ Stacy

Ready for the giveaway to GYCT Designs Shop? Here you go! Good luck!
Follow this link for the Rafflecopter giveaway!

Sail Away Lander Short Tutorial & How To Attach Slotted Buttons

Lander wm 4

I got a lot of positive feedback on my Sail Away Lander shorts that I made in the Who Made It Best challenge. They turned out pretty close to my vision, so I’m happy.

If you’d like to make a pair for yourself or borrow any of my ideas, I’ve put together a tutorial of my modifications to make it easier for you. Check out my Sail Away inspiration board for even more ideas.

I made modifications that fall into three categories: 1. Angle the pocket opening 2. Lengthen for a higher waist and 3. Relocate the fly closure.

I’ll also share how I attached my slotted buttons.

Size: I originally made a pair of Lander pants and shorts in size 10 per the measurement chart. I like the length I get in that size, but really needed to size down to an 8 for a better fit in the width. For my Sail Away Landers I wanted a pretty slim/snug fit in the stretch twill, so I sized down even further to a 6, still keeping the length of my pieces at a size 10.

  1. Angled Pocket

Trace off the pocket pattern piece in your size and be sure to add the grainline marking. Measure and mark a line 3 1/2in away from and parallel to the long edge of the pocket. Mark the point (a) where the slightly curved top edge of the pocket meets the newly drawn parallel line. Measure down 1 3/8in from your (a) mark and mark again (b). Mark point (c) where the original pocket curve meets the side of the pocket. Connect (b) and (c) with a straight line. You now have an angled pocket opening. ** You may have to tweak these measurements slightly for a different size, but they will get you really close. (Original design lines are in grey pencil, newly drafted lines are in blue pencil)

Pocket alteration 1.2

Next up you’ll need to draw a new pocket interfacing piece. Simply trace your new angled pocket edge and draw a matching line 1in away to create the new piece.

Interfacing collage

 

2. Lengthen for a higher waist

I measured down 1 1/2in from top of the side seams (front & back pieces) to mark my lengthen line. Your lengthen line should be perpendicular to the grain line. Cut and spread 1in (or more). I’m short-waisted so 1in was plenty for me.

I chose not to lengthen my pocket piece. If you choose to, I suggest lengthening below the angled pocket opening, so you don’t skew those proportions.

3. Move the fly

We’re mostly just switching up the construction a little. Pin or mark just above the pocket on the side seam. Stitch the side seam closed from bottom(hem) up to your marking and back stitch to reinforce.  The dot marking on the fly pieces will match up to the top of your side seam stitching.

Pin mark

In the pattern instructions the left fly attaches to the left (as worn) center front and the right fly piece attaches to the right (as worn) center front. Instead, you will attach the Left fly to the Front pant/short piece and the Right fly to the Back pant/short piece.

Fly pieces

Fly pieces inside view

Follow the pattern instructions for completing the fly and button closure. The fly pieces as cut will extend up past the waistline, simply trim any excess. Once you have the fly completed, you’ll want to add a securing bar tack through the two fly pieces. Make sure they are laying flat over each other like they do when the fly is closed. Pin together and sew the bar tack through the two layers.

Bar tack detail 1

Note: Moving the fly to the side will make the pattern notches on your waistband irrelevant, but you’ll be fine. Simply attach following the directions and ease any areas that need it.

Things to consider.

  1. I’ve made two Landers before, so I knew I would be ok with a shorter side fly.
  2. I made mine with stretch twill, so going down a size and the shorter fly still works for me.
  3. Raising the waist may require further alterations of your CB seam, darts, and possibly the waistband.

Attaching Slotted Buttons (aka Canadian buttons or bar buttons)

I turned to the Self Sewn Wardrobe facebook group for direction with these.  I got the suggestions that these are attached with a ribbon, twill tape, or self fabric running through them and an example pic from a rtw jacket with this type of closure. I haven’t found a tutorial to verify that I did this properly, but this will get you started. If you have any suggestions, I’d love to hear them.

Your ribbon will run right down the middle of your buttons, so mark your button placement to the outside of each button so you can still see the markings after laying down the ribbon. Don’t skip the marking because we’ll be shifting those buttons up and down on the ribbon as we sew.

placket collage

Cut your ribbon about 1.5 times the length of the fly and slide all the buttons onto the bottom of the ribbon. Starting at the top of the fly. Slide one button up to the top of the ribbon leaving about 5/8in of ribbon extending above the top of the button. Position your button to line up with your placement mark, fold under the top edge of the ribbon by 1/4in and pin the ribbon in place. Also pin or mark your ribbon just above the top of your button. Slide the button down and out of the way to make two bar tacks. One along the top folded edge of the ribbon and the second on the marking for the top of the button. Straight stitch along the edges of the ribbon between the bar tacks.

Slide the button back up into position and get ready to experiment with how much slack you’ll need in the ribbon. I tried using a match stick, chop stick, and a couple other things before settling on the shaft of my seam ripper. Place your spacer beneath your button keeping the button centered with your button placement marking. Pin down the ribbon to line up with the bottom edge of the button. Your next bar tack will go where you pin. Remove your spacer and test how well the button fits through the button holes. Adjust as needed. When you have the slack determined and the ribbon pinned, slide the button up as far as you can and make a bar tack where you pinned. Your first button is now secured.

Button detail

Repeat this process for the rest of your buttons. Positioning your button with the ribbon flat, marking and sewing the top bar tack along the top edge of the button, repositioning the button with your spacer to get your slack, and marking and sewing the bottom bar tack. If you have a presser foot that will fit, straight stitch along the ribbon edges between your buttons. (I couldn’t make that work.)

Slotted Button Detail 1

After all your buttons are secured, leave enough ribbon to extend to the bottom of the fly and straight stitch along the ribbon edges to secure. I was also able to catch the bottom of my ribbon in a bar tack that I used to secure my fly pieces together. Trim any excess.

Next time I’d do the top button with a separate piece of ribbon. I think I’d like the looks of that better. I’d also apply my buttons before attaching the waistband, then I could secured top edge of the ribbon in a seam and have a nicer finish.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

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Tabor Vneck and Lander Shorts

Have you seen the newly released Tabor Vneck from Sew House Seven?

There are many options to choose from in the pattern, but I was most drawn to the cropped sweater version. I thought it would look great with a pair of Lander Shorts I’ve been planning.

 

About the Tabor

The Pattern: Tabor Vneck view 5 (cropped sweater) in size medium with no alterations. This is an easy pattern to put together, but setting in the point on a Vneck can be tricky to do without puckers. The pattern instructions walk you through a construction technique for the V that I’ve had the most success with.

The Fabric: The Tabor was sewn using baby French Terry in two toned burgundy from Simply by Ti Fabrics*. This view of the Tabor is made for sweater knits with stretch and the fabric works perfectly. I have the stretch that is required and the baby FT is light enough for spring weather and drapes well.

 

About the Landers

The pattern: Lander Shorts from True Bias Patterns in size 10. No alterations.

The fabric: Stretch Denim from Simply by Ti Fabrics*. I did not size down to account for the stretch and they fit just fine for photos, but after a hot humid day at a Florida amusement park they were feeling a little loose. I’d go down a size next time. I’d recommend starting with your regular size and slim down at the side seams if needed (this fitting step is included in the pattern instructions anyway).

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I received complimentary fabrics for this post from the Simply By Ti shop to use in exchange for sharing it with you.

You might also like: The Lander Pants I made for the Breaking Ground Blog Tour.

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VS Pattern Showdown: 5 Women’s Tank Patterns Go Head to Head

Welcome back to VS.

An occasional series here at mahlicadesigns with the aim of pairing similar style patterns against each other in a friendly showdown to see which pattern better suits me, all while working through my pattern stash.

 

Today I’m comparing 5 knit tank tops:

Dahlia Tank from Leala Jeyne

Durango Tank from Hey June Handmade

Greenwood Tank from Straight Stitch Designs

Idyllwild Tee from Itch to Stitch

Lago Tank from Itch to Stitch

VS. Tanks front collage 2

The Dahlia Tank is “a well-fitting tank top for use with knit fabrics in cup sizes A-E. The scoop neckline is finished with bindings, not bands, for a professional look. Hip and crop lengths.”

The Durango Tank is a “casual sleeveless shirt with a center back seam and longer flared hem… is fitted at the shoulder and bust and loose through the waist and hip for an easy fit.”

The Greenwood Tank features “a wide open neckline and two back options.”

The Idyllwild Tee is a “fitted t-shirt and dress pattern… jam-packed with options… you can literally make 42 garments with different looks!”

The Lago Tank is a relaxed fit racerback tank with slightly scooped neckline.

For all my tanks I used the 10oz cotton lycra solids from Simply By Ti. I’ve used this C/L in many projects as I love the weight and quality (here & here & here & here & here). As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I received complimentary fabrics for this post from the Simply By Ti shop to use in exchange for sharing it with you.

Now let’s compare.

VS. Tanks front collage 1

VS. Tanks front collage 2

Left to right: Dahlia in Cobalt, Durango in Eggplant, Greenwood in Tomato Red, Idyllwild in Fuchsia, Lago in Turquiose

Instructions.

Dahlia: Beginner friendly and easy to follow. I still managed to finish the neck and arm opening with a band instead of a binding by mistake.

Durango: Beginner friendly and easy to follow.

Greenwood: Beginner friendly and easy to follow. Link to video demonstrating binding technique.

Idyllwild: Beginner friendly and easy to follow. Pattern notches included to line up curved side seams and position the bands.

Lago: Beginner friendly and easy to follow. Pattern notches included to line up curved side seams and position the bands.

VS tanks back collage 1

VS tanks back collage 2

Left to right: Dahlia in Cobalt, Durango in Eggplant, Greenwood in Tomato Red, Idyllwild in Fuchsia, Lago in Turquiose

Fit.

Dahlia: Size small graded to medium at the hip per my measurements. A little bit of bunching at the shoulder seam area.

Durango:  Size 10 per my measurements. Dropped shoulder adjustment of 3/8in was critical to reduce gaping. I don’t think I stretched the binding around the armscye, enough as you can see there is still gaping going on there.

Greenwood: Size 10 per my measurements. Shortened front and back straps by 1/4in and then did a 1/4in dropped shoulder adjustment.  Shortened 1/2in at hemline.

Idyllwild: Size small graded to medium at hips. Shoulder seam sits back about 1/4in from my shoulder point. A 1/4in dropped shoulder adjustment to the front bodice should fix that. Neckband pattern piece seems a tad too long around the CF curve. It will need to be shortened 1/2in.

Lago: Size 6 graded to 8 at the hips. No shoulder adjustment needed (due to racerback shape?) Bands fit perfectly.

** For all these patterns I’ll need a sway back adjustment and to grade the back piece a little larger at the hip to account for my full seat.

VS tanks side collage 3

VS tanks side collage 2

Left to right: Dahlia in Cobalt, Durango in Eggplant, Greenwood in Tomato Red, Idyllwild in Fuchsia, Lago in Turquiose

Style.

Dahlia: Standard and cropped options. I like the gently curved hem.

Durango:  CB seam allows for easy swayback adjustment if needed and potentially easier to use up your remnants. Swing style minimizes the need to grade for wider hips. Racerback bra needed.

Greenwood: Wider scooped neckline. Straps give great coverage.

Idyllwild: Sleeveless style gives more coverage across the shoulders.

Lago: Cute racerback curves, but racerback bra needed.

VS tanks side collage 2

Left to right: Dahlia in Cobalt, Durango in Eggplant, Greenwood in Tomato Red, Idyllwild in Fuchsia, Lago in Turquiose

Investment.

Dahlia: $11  Two length options included.

Durango: $0 One view included.

Greenwood: $10-$12 Two neckline options included.

Idyllwild: $10 includes multiple sleeve, neckline, and length options.

Lago: $0 One view included.

Durango collage

For me, the Durango is the winner. I like the fit through the body and the pattern just needs a little tweaking to adjust for my swayback.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagramBloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

This post contains affiliate links, if you purchase through my links I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

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B6388 Top for the Red White and Pink Tour

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As I moved my cold weather tops into my dresser last fall, I found myself unable to descern what was what in the stacks of grey, black, and navy. Man did I need some variety, so I’ve worked on addeding some color (here & here) and print (here).

When I was selecting fabric for my next Simply By Ti Ambassador* project, I thought I’d go in an unexpected direction by choosing a super bright pink. I haven’t worn pink in at least a decade, so I’m not even sure if it works for me, but here we go. What do you think?

I don’t usually dress on theme for holidays, but I think I’m going to be pretty in pink this Valentines day. The Red White and Pink tour will be full of ideas for you to check out along the theme -keep reading to the end to see the full tour.

The Pattern:  B6388 view C in a size medium with no alterations.  I’d made the dress view previously, so there was no guesswork as to fit or size.

Just after I had finished my top version, Elle Gee posted about two dresses she made with the pattern. I think I need to try some color mixing next.

The Fabric:  Fuchsia French Terry from Simply by Ti. I’ve sewn with the French Terry from the shop several times and I just love it. It’s soft, has just the right body, and is easy to sew with.

 

We’re sharing Red White and Pink all month.
Let’s get inspired!

February 1st: Sewing By Ti (intro),  Mahlica Designs
2nd: Sewing With D
3rd: Sewing With Sarah
Sunday, February 4th: Tenille’s Thread
5th: My Heart will Sew On
6th: Kathy Kwilts and More
7th: Stitched By Jennie
8th: EYMM
9th: With Love In Every Stitch
10th: The Bear and the Pea Atelier
Sunday, February 11th: Our Play Place
12th: My Sewing Roots
13th: Margarita on the Ross
14th: Very Blissful
15th: Seams Sew Lo
16th: Sew Sew Ilse
17th: Aurora Designs
Sunday, February 18th: Sewing Scientist
19th: Manning the Machine
20th: The Fairy Dust Bin
21st: Hazelnut Handmade
22nd: Kate Will Knit
23rd: Lulu & Celeste
24th: Flaxfield Sewing
Sunday, February 25th: Twinado Alley
26th: Ma Moose
27th: Auschick Sews
28th: Oak Blue Designs

 

 

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

Flounce Dress featuring Simply By Ti Fabrics

As my little guy is getting older, I’m getting back to a place where I can easily wear dresses again. I find that when it comes to dresses, I’m drawn to the short sleeve and sleeveless looks, leaving a gap in my wardrobe for the fall and winter.

I have a couple long sleeve dresses now for everyday wear, but I’ve been wanting something a little less casual.  I really liked the nice front and back v-neck and fitted bodice of the Flounce Dress from DG Patterns.

For my Simply By Ti Ambassador** project, I chose the black and white ponte from Simply by Ti. It shouldn’t be any surprise that I was drawn to the graphic print. I like working with ponte for its stability and ponte being a little heavier weight works really well for cold weather garments.

The Pattern:  Flounce Dress and Top from DG Patterns*. The pattern comes loaded with options; including a top or dress version, several necklines, sleeve lengths, gathered or pleated skirt, and of course the flounce detail. I chose to make the long sleeve dress with moderate v-neck, pleated skirt and no flounce.

I made a size 10 per my measurements and the fit is wonderful. I did make two modifications for fit that are pretty normal for me. I shorten the skirt by about 5in for it to hit where I like and slimmed down the sleeves for my skinny arms.

I’ll remind you to always read the instructions first. I was moving along though the pattern and had almost made myself the sleeveless version. (The sleeve construction is included with the instructions for the top version)

The Fabric:  Black and White ponte from Simply by Ti. The weight of the ponte will give me just enough warmth for my cold weather dress, but most of all I just love this print.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

**As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project in exchange for sharing it with you.

*This post may contain affiliate links, if you purchase through my links I get a small portion to help pay for my sewing hobby.