My Montavilla Dress for Minerva

I’ve been on a small Sew House Seven sewing kick for a while. I’ve made up the Free Range Slacks, a short sleeve Merlo Field tee, and an Underwood Tank and Dress. I’m sure I’ll be making another Toaster Sweater soon too.

Today I’d like to give you a look at my latest Sew House Seven creation, the Montavilla Dress that I made for the Minerva blogger network. You can read the full details here.

Until next time,

Melissa E of mahlicadesigns

Layered V-Neck Tutorial from mahlicadesigns

I ran across a picture of a v-neck tee a while back that had a double layered neck band and added it to my collection of interesting clothing details to try someday. Unlike most things in my little collection, I did spend some time working this one out using the Tabor V-neck pattern and I’ve put together a tutorial to share with you.

For my layered V-neck I used oatmeal Baby French Terry from Simply By Ti. The baby french terry is light enough to drape nicely in the Tabor and there’s barely any bulk in the double layered neckband. When choosing fabric for your project, experiment by folding layers together to see if you like how they look.

I’m really happy with the overall look I achieved with the layered neckband and this color has been a very useful addition to my wardrobe. If I were to do it again though, I might not use the Tabor pattern combined with this technique. The V on the Tabor is pretty deep and using a narrower band than the pattern calls for at the center front makes me feel a little exposed.

Maybe, but probably not, I’ll put on the wider band that the Tabor calls for (because I love this top) and make another layered V-neck using another pattern.

Layered V-Neck Tutorial

The measurements provided are based on the Tabor V-neck size 8. As a guideline, the outerband should come down and cover approximately 2/3 the length of the front of your v-neck, shoulder to center front. My innerband starts at the shoulder and goes to center front. You can also cut the inner band to fit the entire neckband if you are not concerned about bulk.
You can adapt the technique to your favorite V-neck tee pattern, but you’ll need to adjust the band lengths I’ve given to fit.

Cut your custom bands:

Innerband cut 2:   2.25in X 14in    (3/4in finished width)

Outerband cut 1:   3in X 25in    (1 1/8in finished width)

Interface the center V on the bodice of your tee and sew the front and back together at the shoulders.

Apply fusible web along the short ends of the outerband piece. Fold back the short ends wrong sides together by 1/2in and press to secure with the fusible web.

Mark the center (center back) and mark the shoulder seams 5in away from center back on the outerband.

Sew the innerband pieces together forming a V at center front. Using a 3/8in seam allowance, insert and baste the innerband into place along the V. Don’t baste the entire length of the inner bands, just a few inches around the center V.

Starting at center back, leaving the outerband unfolded, pin the single layer of the outerband in place along the neckline. Stretch the outerband slightly as you pin in place from center back to the shoulder seam. The bands don’t need to be eased in from shoulder to center front.

Next, pin the innerband in place along the bottom portion of the neckline up to the shoulder seam. The innerband should overlap the single layer of the outerband.  Trim away any excess length of the inner band that extends past the shoulder seam.

Lastly, fold over the outerband, sandwiching the innerband within and repin all layers as needed along the entire neckline. Remember the outerband is eased slightly between the shoulders and center back.

If you want to check your proportions first, baste the entire neck band into place (innerband and outerband now functioning as one unit) using a 3/8in seam allowance.

Sew/serge your layered neckband into place using 3/8in seam allowance. Complete the construction of your tee per the pattern instructions.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

You might also like: Tabor V-Neck and Lander shorts

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Underwood Tank and Dress

Last summer we had a week of 100 degree temps, the upper level of our home was in the 90s, and my husband was trying so hard to get our evaporation cooler working. It was one of those weeks where we have serious discussions about if it is worth the big money to install air conditioning.

So when Peggy of Sew House Seven put out a call to test her new Underwood Tank and Dress pattern and mentioned that she had those hot summer days in mind when she designed it, a chord was struck in my mind. A barely there dress- yes, yes please!

My first version (the test version) I made up in a floral rayon spandex that I received in a prize box from Simply By Ti. I’m not big on florals or pink but I thought this would make a great nightgown and it does.

My second version was the tank option (final pattern) made up in the Bordeaux Organic Bamboo jersey from DG Patterns*. This final version of the pattern has the straps shifted slightly outward toward the shoulder. I honestly can’t tell the difference between the final and the beta version. Both cover bra straps so I’m good. The pattern includes options for a single fold hem finish at the neckline and armscyes or a facing. I really like the low bulk option of the single fold. I think it works really nicely to make this a light weight dress and top.

So far, this summer in Colorado hasn’t been a scorcher, but I’m ready none the less. What do you sew to cope with the summer heat?

The Pattern: The Underwood Tank and Dress. Knee length dress and tank versions made in size 10 with no alterations. I usually have to shorten everything, but I liked where this dress and tank falls. Keep an eye out for expanded sizes in the future for this pattern.

The Fabric: Organic bamboo jersey in Bordeaux from DG Patterns shop and Floral rayon spandex from Simply by Ti.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

This post may contain affiliate links that are denoted*. If you purchase through my links, I get a small commission to help pay for my sewing hobby.

Tabor Vneck and Lander Shorts

Have you seen the newly released Tabor Vneck from Sew House Seven?

There are many options to choose from in the pattern, but I was most drawn to the cropped sweater version. I thought it would look great with a pair of Lander Shorts I’ve been planning.

 

About the Tabor

The Pattern: Tabor Vneck view 5 (cropped sweater) in size medium with no alterations. This is an easy pattern to put together, but setting in the point on a Vneck can be tricky to do without puckers. The pattern instructions walk you through a construction technique for the V that I’ve had the most success with.

The Fabric: The Tabor was sewn using baby French Terry in two toned burgundy from Simply by Ti Fabrics*. This view of the Tabor is made for sweater knits with stretch and the fabric works perfectly. I have the stretch that is required and the baby FT is light enough for spring weather and drapes well.

 

About the Landers

The pattern: Lander Shorts from True Bias Patterns in size 10. No alterations.

The fabric: Stretch Denim from Simply by Ti Fabrics*. I did not size down to account for the stretch and they fit just fine for photos, but after a hot humid day at a Florida amusement park they were feeling a little loose. I’d go down a size next time. I’d recommend starting with your regular size and slim down at the side seams if needed (this fitting step is included in the pattern instructions anyway).

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

*As a Simply by Ti Ambassador I received complimentary fabrics for this post from the Simply By Ti shop to use in exchange for sharing it with you.

You might also like: The Lander Pants I made for the Breaking Ground Blog Tour.

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Sew Long Summer…hello Chi Towns and Toaster Sweater

I’m saying Sew Long Summer with two items that have been a long time coming.

I’ve needed a classic pair of trousers (that fit), since my son was born five years ago.

Feeling pretty good about the Chi Town Chino shorts that I’ve been making, it seemed a natural choice to use the Chi Town expansion pack to make my first pair of trousers.

I’m really pleased with how they came out; though after an hour and a half into making the welt pockets I thought I’d never reach the end of them. Hang in there, the pockets come out so nicely and the rest of the pant moves along quickly.

The Pattern: Chi Town Chino Pants (expansion pack) in Size 8.

The Fabric: Black twill from Imagine Gnats (now sold out)

For my top, I’m revisiting the Toaster Sweater. When I made it last spring (here) I honestly didn’t think I’d make another one, but it turns out the Toaster was just the pattern for showcasing my surface design idea.

I’ve had my heart set on some tapir fabric since seeing some on etsy last year. After watching Elizabeth Made This use fabric stamping so often, I was really encouraged that I could give stamping my own fabric a try (it took about a year of thinking about it though).

I used a Speedball kit (similar) and Jacquard fabric paint from my stash. I think I spent about thirty minutes carving the stamp and another ten stamping the fabric. After Elizabeth’s advice, I heat set the fabric paint for a good five minutes and let the fabric dry an additional week before laundering. So far so good.

The pattern: Toaster Sweater from Sew House Seven size medium with no alterations.

The fabric: French terry in mint from Simply by Ti Fabrics – oh my goodness is this so soft and cozy.

As always, thanks for reading today. I hope you’ll visit todays bloggers in the Sew Long Summer Blog tour.

Tuesday: mahlicadesigns, My Heart Will So On, Couturious, Anne-Mari Sews, Adventures With Bubba and Bug

 

Toaster Sweater for spring featuring Simply By Ti

Simply by Ti Fabrics recently let me pick one of her new open weave fabrics to try out. I chose the Black Crochet off of my wishlist with plans to do a pattern hack similar to this with the Blanc Tee. I altered my plan though, once I had the fabric in hand.

I was picturing a thin fabric more like lace (though I don’t know why), but this turned out to be just a bit heavier and thicker than the Hacci sweater knits I’ve used in the past with a similar mechanical stretch. The fiber content feels like a cotton or other natural fiber and is really soft.

New plan: Use the Toaster Sweater to create a transitional spring piece that I can use for a lacey looking top.

My initial thought was that I would need to stabalize all the seams so the open weave wouldn’t pull apart and ruin my piece. I decided to eliminate the cuffs and bottom band to minimize the number of seams that I would have to treat in this way. I simply extended the bodice and sleeves to make up the difference.

It turned out I didn’t need to stabalize all the seams after all. I did a test run through my overlocker on some scraps, played tug of war with them, and I have no worries about these seems. I did decide to add a strip of knit jersey as I sewed the neckline to give that seam some extra support.

Here you can see how I folded it over to encase the neckline seam.

For the hems, I did a double fold hem with a hand catch stitch for a nice looking finish that would have some stretch to it.

The PatternToaster Sweater 1 from Sew House Seven paired with my Goldenrod skirt. I can’t give a complete review here because of the changes I made and using an off book fabric choice, but I will share a few of the first impressions I had of the pattern. The pattern is pretty basic and the use of bands and cuffs eliminate the need for hemming, making the construction really easy. A sewing newbie could easily sew this up. I personally could have done with a more condensed version of the instructions.

 

Does your fabric sometimes throw your plans for a loop, how do figure out what to do?

As always, thanks for stopping by today.

*Simply by Ti provided the fabric for today’s creation in exchange for a review. These are my honest thoughts on the fabric.

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