Sail Away Lander Short Tutorial & How To Attach Slotted Buttons

Lander wm 4

I got a lot of positive feedback on my Sail Away Lander shorts that I made in the Who Made It Best challenge. They turned out pretty close to my vision, so I’m happy.

If you’d like to make a pair for yourself or borrow any of my ideas, I’ve put together a tutorial of my modifications to make it easier for you. Check out my Sail Away inspiration board for even more ideas.

I made modifications that fall into three categories: 1. Angle the pocket opening 2. Lengthen for a higher waist and 3. Relocate the fly closure.

I’ll also share how I attached my slotted buttons.

Size: I originally made a pair of Lander pants and shorts in size 10 per the measurement chart. I like the length I get in that size, but really needed to size down to an 8 for a better fit in the width. For my Sail Away Landers I wanted a pretty slim/snug fit in the stretch twill, so I sized down even further to a 6, still keeping the length of my pieces at a size 10.

  1. Angled Pocket

Trace off the pocket pattern piece in your size and be sure to add the grainline marking. Measure and mark a line 3 1/2in away from and parallel to the long edge of the pocket. Mark the point (a) where the slightly curved top edge of the pocket meets the newly drawn parallel line. Measure down 1 3/8in from your (a) mark and mark again (b). Mark point (c) where the original pocket curve meets the side of the pocket. Connect (b) and (c) with a straight line. You now have an angled pocket opening. ** You may have to tweak these measurements slightly for a different size, but they will get you really close. (Original design lines are in grey pencil, newly drafted lines are in blue pencil)

Pocket alteration 1.2

Next up you’ll need to draw a new pocket interfacing piece. Simply trace your new angled pocket edge and draw a matching line 1in away to create the new piece.

Interfacing collage

 

2. Lengthen for a higher waist

I measured down 1 1/2in from top of the side seams (front & back pieces) to mark my lengthen line. Your lengthen line should be perpendicular to the grain line. Cut and spread 1in (or more). I’m short-waisted so 1in was plenty for me.

I chose not to lengthen my pocket piece. If you choose to, I suggest lengthening below the angled pocket opening, so you don’t skew those proportions.

3. Move the fly

We’re mostly just switching up the construction a little. Pin or mark just above the pocket on the side seam. Stitch the side seam closed from bottom(hem) up to your marking and back stitch to reinforce.  The dot marking on the fly pieces will match up to the top of your side seam stitching.

Pin mark

In the pattern instructions the left fly attaches to the left (as worn) center front and the right fly piece attaches to the right (as worn) center front. Instead, you will attach the Left fly to the Front pant/short piece and the Right fly to the Back pant/short piece.

Fly pieces

Fly pieces inside view

Follow the pattern instructions for completing the fly and button closure. The fly pieces as cut will extend up past the waistline, simply trim any excess. Once you have the fly completed, you’ll want to add a securing bar tack through the two fly pieces. Make sure they are laying flat over each other like they do when the fly is closed. Pin together and sew the bar tack through the two layers.

Bar tack detail 1

Note: Moving the fly to the side will make the pattern notches on your waistband irrelevant, but you’ll be fine. Simply attach following the directions and ease any areas that need it.

Things to consider.

  1. I’ve made two Landers before, so I knew I would be ok with a shorter side fly.
  2. I made mine with stretch twill, so going down a size and the shorter fly still works for me.
  3. Raising the waist may require further alterations of your CB seam, darts, and possibly the waistband.

Attaching Slotted Buttons (aka Canadian buttons or bar buttons)

I turned to the Self Sewn Wardrobe facebook group for direction with these.  I got the suggestions that these are attached with a ribbon, twill tape, or self fabric running through them and an example pic from a rtw jacket with this type of closure. I haven’t found a tutorial to verify that I did this properly, but this will get you started. If you have any suggestions, I’d love to hear them.

Your ribbon will run right down the middle of your buttons, so mark your button placement to the outside of each button so you can still see the markings after laying down the ribbon. Don’t skip the marking because we’ll be shifting those buttons up and down on the ribbon as we sew.

placket collage

Cut your ribbon about 1.5 times the length of the fly and slide all the buttons onto the bottom of the ribbon. Starting at the top of the fly. Slide one button up to the top of the ribbon leaving about 5/8in of ribbon extending above the top of the button. Position your button to line up with your placement mark, fold under the top edge of the ribbon by 1/4in and pin the ribbon in place. Also pin or mark your ribbon just above the top of your button. Slide the button down and out of the way to make two bar tacks. One along the top folded edge of the ribbon and the second on the marking for the top of the button. Straight stitch along the edges of the ribbon between the bar tacks.

Slide the button back up into position and get ready to experiment with how much slack you’ll need in the ribbon. I tried using a match stick, chop stick, and a couple other things before settling on the shaft of my seam ripper. Place your spacer beneath your button keeping the button centered with your button placement marking. Pin down the ribbon to line up with the bottom edge of the button. Your next bar tack will go where you pin. Remove your spacer and test how well the button fits through the button holes. Adjust as needed. When you have the slack determined and the ribbon pinned, slide the button up as far as you can and make a bar tack where you pinned. Your first button is now secured.

Button detail

Repeat this process for the rest of your buttons. Positioning your button with the ribbon flat, marking and sewing the top bar tack along the top edge of the button, repositioning the button with your spacer to get your slack, and marking and sewing the bottom bar tack. If you have a presser foot that will fit, straight stitch along the ribbon edges between your buttons. (I couldn’t make that work.)

Slotted Button Detail 1

After all your buttons are secured, leave enough ribbon to extend to the bottom of the fly and straight stitch along the ribbon edges to secure. I was also able to catch the bottom of my ribbon in a bar tack that I used to secure my fly pieces together. Trim any excess.

Next time I’d do the top button with a separate piece of ribbon. I think I’d like the looks of that better. I’d also apply my buttons before attaching the waistband, then I could secured top edge of the ribbon in a seam and have a nicer finish.

As always, thanks for reading today.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

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Pin this image, so you can come back when you’re ready to start sewing your version.

 

 

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Lander Shorts – Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best from mahlicadesigns.

 

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my sewing friends joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

WMIB Label 4

Arielle from Seen & Sewn Patterns has joined me in making up the Lander Shorts for this week’s challenge. Please also check out Arielle’s blog here to see her super cute version. Isn’t this print she choose wonderful?

Arielle collage

The Lander Shorts are a high waist button fly short/pant pattern with optional expansion pack for a zipper fly.

Lander wm 2

I’ve already made a pair of Lander shorts (here) and pants (here) and was ready to try something different with this pair. My inspiration started with a picture of a side button closure and grew into a board of ideas for what I’m calling my Sail Away outfit.

Lander wm 4

The details I settled on for the shorts are an angled pocket opening, button fly closure moved to the side seam, and a high waist.

I’m wearing a Durango tank from Hey June that I modified with a lower neckline and a contrast piece at the lower bodice. Totally forgot to get photos of that- geesh.

** I’ll have a seperate blog post soon to walk you through how to make these modifications. (Find the tutorial here)

Lander wm 1

Lander wm 5

The Pattern: Lander Shorts made in size 6 and modified as described.

The Fabric: Khaki stretch twill from Simply By Ti. I only needed 1 yard!

Lander wm closeup

So, who do you think made their Landers the best?

Please visit Seen & Sewn Patterns for more pictures of Arielle’s version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both blogs, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can also take a look at the Bronte Tee, Shoreline Boatneck, Sorbetto Top,  Greenwood Tank, Cheyenne Tunic, Chi Town Chinos, and  Ladies Caroline Dress that were part of past Who Made It Best challenges.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.

Ladies Caroline Dress- Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best, a series on mahlicadesigns.

 

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my fellow bloggers joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

Ladies Caroline side by side collage 2

Jillayne from Hazelnut Handmade has joined me in making up the Ladies Caroline Dress for this week’s challenge. The Ladies Caroline Dress has a fitted bodice with gathered or pleated skirt, with several sleeve and neckline options. Please check out Jillayne’s blog here to see what she made.

The Caroline Dress pattern was one of the first pdf’s I ever purchased, but at the time I thought it was above my skill level so it got set aside. How things have changed; my sewing skills have improved to a point where I found this pattern quite easy to make.

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 4

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 1

I didn’t notice this in my muslin, but I got some serious gapping in the back armscye. I took out a 1/2in wedge along the shoulder seam for this version and altered my pattern to take out an additional 1/2in wedge across the shoulder blade if I should choose to make the pattern again.

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 7

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 8

 

The Pattern: Ladies Caroline Dress made in size 10 and altered as described.

The Fabric: Robert Kauffman’s London Calling primrose pansy cotton lawn. I used 1.75 yards.

Ladies Caroline by mahlicadesigns 9

So, who do you think made their Ladies Caroline Dress the best? Please visit Hazelnut Handmade for more pictures and details on her version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both blogs, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can also take a look at the Bronte Tee, Shoreline Boatneck, Sorbetto Top,  Greenwood Tank, Cheyenne Tunic, and Chi Town Chinos that were part of past Who Made It Best challenges.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.

Chi Town Chinos- Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best, a series on mahlicadesigns.

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my blogger friends joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

Ct side by side 2 label

Sewing with Sarah has joined me in making up the Chi Town Chinos for this week’s challenge. The Chi Town Chinos are a relaxed fit short and skirt pattern with optional expansion packs for a fitted trouser or fitted longer short. Alina Sewing & Design was so kind to provide Sarah with a complimentary copy of the original pattern plus expansion pack for our challenge.  Please check out Sarah’s blog here to see what she made.

I’ve had the inspiration for todays Chi Town jean hack waiting on a Pinterest board until my pant making chops were a little more practiced and for the right boyfriend cut jean pattern to come my way. I had been waiting for the Morgan boyfriend jean pattern to go on sale, when a facebook friend pointed out that I could use my Chi Town pattern instead. Bingo!

CT 2 wm

To get the boyfriend cut look, I added 1/2in at the hem line to both the inseam and outseam of the front and back pieces, then graded that increase down to zero just above the knee point. Next, I added width to the pocket pattern piece so I could add a couple tucks to the pocket detail.

CT pocket wm

My final pattern modification was to shift the location of the side seams. I wanted the woven striped panel to cover part of the front and back side while still being able to encase the raw edge of my striped woven. I trimmed away 1in from the side seam of the front piece and added 1in to the side seam of the back piece.

CT 3 wm

After my pattern alterations I was able to follow the pattern instructions like usual to construct the pants, with one additional step. Before sewing up the side seams, I basted the woven panel to the side seam edge of the back piece and also topstitched the selvage edge of the woven down.

Construction detail label 1.1

Details for my enjoyment: 1. Hong Kong finished side seams 2. bound waistband facing 3. label on the fly shield 4. tuck detail on the pocket.

sewing wins collage

Blooper reel: 1. button-hole is wonky and a smidge tight 2. I made the front pockets effectively useless by shifting the side seam.

Blunder collage

The Pattern: Chi Town Chino Expansion pack #2 made in size 6 and altered as described.

The Fabric: Grey stretch denim(sold out)  from Finch Fabrics and what I think is a Guatemalan striped woven from inherited stash. The stretch in my denim is a big player in accomplishing the boyfriend fit.

CT 5 wm

So, who do you think made their Chi Town’s best? Please visit Sewing with Sarah for more pictures and details on her version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both blogs, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can also take a look at the Bronte Tee, Shoreline Boatneck, Sorbetto Top,  Greenwood Tank and Cheyenne Tunic that were part of past Who Made It Best challenges.

Are you interested in a challenge? Contact me at mahlicadesigns@gmail.com to join in the WMIB fun for 2018.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.

Cheyenne Tunic- Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best, a series on mahlicadesigns.

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my blogger friends joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

Cheyenne collage 1 label

Victoria from Very Blissful has joined me in making up the Cheyenne Tunic from Hey June Handmade** for this weeks challenge. Please check out Victoria’s version here.

Cheyenne closeup

I chose to do two hacks on my Cheyenne for the challenge. The first was to make it sleeveless following the tutorial on the designers blog, well, because it’s July and I’m hot.

The tutorial is ok if you are comfortable with drafting, but I’m not the “just draw a new armscye” type. I redraft my patterns all the time, but freehanding an armscye curve leaves too much room for error for my taste. This tutorial/hack will work best if you have a tnt sleeveless pattern that you can trace off.

Cheyenne  7.2

My second hack was to extend the right collar band across the front to make a key hole opening.  You can see below how I extended the collar band out 2.5in from the bottom edge and retraced the curved leading edge. I could use a smidge more room for the button-hole, so you might try extending it out 3in if you want to copy my look.

Collar band extension hack

I’ve been needing to try my more of the blouse patterns in my stash, so I’m very glad Victoria asked to make the Cheyenne for the challenge. White blouses are always a staple in my mind and I feel like I have a winner with this one.

Cheyenne 9 wm

So, who do you think made their Cheyenne Tunic best? Please visit Very Blissful for more pictures and details on her version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both blogs, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can also take a look at the Bronte Tee, Shoreline Boatneck, Sorbetto Top and Greenwood Tank that were part of past Who Made It Best challenges.

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.

**This post may contain affiliate links, if you purchase through my links I get a small portion to help pay for my sewing hobby.

Greenwood Tank – Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best, a series on mahlicadesigns.

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my blogger friends joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

Greenwood side by side 2 label 1

Elizabeth from Elizabeth Made This has joined me in making up the Greenwood Tank from Straight Stitch Designs for the challenge and you can check out her version here.

Greenwood 25

Almost everyone needs summer tanks and they are a wardrobe workhorse for me in my non air-conditioned house, but to be honest I struggled a little with how to make a straight forward design seem interesting enough for the Who Made It Best challenge. My challenger, Elizabeth, is a whiz at pattern hacking and surface design, so I felt pretty intimidated trying to go one of these routes and they really didn’t feel “me” for this project.

Greenwood 17

I put together a Greenwood Inspiration pinterest board with all kinds of ideas I want to try, but I settled on accenting the geometric print of my fabric with a triangular insert at the center back neckline. This does feel “me”.

Greenwood 18

For the body of my Greenwood, I used the Circuit Ashen knit from Art Gallery fabrics and a stretchy metallic looking mystery fabric for the triangle insert.

Greenwood 23

I was super careful getting the placement correct for the triangle insert; measuring and double checking and I still got that sucker kinda crooked. Gah!

Greenwood 12 close up

So, who do you think made the Greenwood Tank best? Please visit Elizabeth Made This for more pictures and details on her version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both blogs, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

You can also take a look at the Bronte Tee, Shoreline Boatneck, and Sorbetto Top that were part of past Who Made It Best challenges.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.

Bronte Top – Who Made It Best

Welcome back to Who Made It Best, a new series on mahlicadesigns.

Who Made It Best is a friendly challenge where one of my blogger friends joins me in making up the same pattern to see Who Made It Best. The challenge rules are simple: 1. We agree on a pattern to use 2. sew it up to suit our personal styles 3. share it with you and ask you to vote. (Oh, and we keep what we’re up to a secret from each other)

collage 1 label 3

Rachel from Sew RED-y has joined me in making up the Bronte Top from Jennifer Lauren Handmade for the challenge and you can check out her version here.

Bronte 2

This is my first try at making a Bronte Top and I’d say it’s only a so so try. I was between sizes and accidentaly cut the size smaller instead of the size up. I’m getting pulling and bunching on the shoulder overlap and the shoulder seam is pretty wonky. After I snapped these photos, I noticed I completely missed the instructions to tack them down to prevent this very problem.

Bronte close up

I’m not sure if I can get over the snug fit on this one. I feel like I prespire a lot, so tops that are snug under my arms make me very uncomfortable.

Bronte 4

On the bright side, I’m very pleased with this outfit. I’m a chicken when it comes to mixing prints, but I think these work well together.

Bronte offset label 1

So, who do you think made the Bronte Top best? Please visit Sew RED-Y for more pictures and details on her version, then place your vote for Who Made It Best. The poll will be on both sites, so you can see both versions before you choose your favorite. Voting open for one week and results will be posted on Instagram.

VOTE HERE

You can follow me on instagram, Bloglovin, or by entering your email in the right side bar.

As always, thanks for visiting and voting today.

If you’d like to join me in a challenge this fall, shoot me a message at mahlicadesigns@gmail.com